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California's new formula for financing schools provides more money to districts with large numbers of poor and/or English-learner students, giving local officials an incentive to count as many of those "high needs" students as possible.

The Local Control Funding Formula, enacted last year by Gov. Jerry Brown and the Legislature, is aimed at closing what's called the "achievement gap."

However, the actual count of those students is falling short of estimates in three of the state's five largest districts, according to a survey by EdSource, a website that reports on education trends in California.

Los Angeles Unified, the state's largest school district with about 10 percent of the state's six million K-12 students, had expected that 86 percent of its students would qualify for the extra money, but has found that just 81 percent meet the criteria.

Similar shortfalls were discovered in San Diego Unified and Elk Grove Unified. However, the hard counts in Fresno Unified and Long Beach Unified were slightly above estimates. The state has yet to release the official counts of high-needs students.

PHOTO: At right, Maiya Miller, 8, hugs Principal Shana Henry on the first day of school at Pacific Elementary school in Sacramento on September 3, 2013. The Sacramento Bee/Renee C. Byer



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