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December 8, 2008
Rioting in Greece
Youths angry over the killing of a teenager by the police took to the streets in Athens and other Greek cities for a second day on Sunday, burning shops, cars and businesses in the worst rioting in recent years. The violence continued despite swift action by the government, which charged a police officer with premeditated manslaughter in the shooting death of the 15-year-old on Saturday night. The country's prime minister -- whose government is already unpopular because of a series of corruption scandals -- also wrote a letter of apology to the boy's parents. The riots began hours after the boy was shot during a confrontation between the police and youths in the Exarchia neighborhood of central Athens, a district of bars, bookshops and restaurants where young leftists live and socialize. (18 images) --wire services

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Riot police try to avoid a petrol bomb during clashes in central Athens on Sunday, Dec. 7. Riots broke out Sunday in the Greek capital as demonstrators protested the fatal police shooting of a teenager in Athens the previous night. Youths hurled firebombs, rocks and other objects at riot police, who responded with tear gas. The circumstances surrounding the shooting of a 16-year-old boy by a police special guard in the downtown Athens district of Exarchia are still unclear. But the death triggered extensive riots in cities around the country overnight, with youths burning shops, setting up flaming barricades across streets and torching cars. AP / Thanassis Stavrakis

MORE IMAGES



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Riot police avoid fire bombs thrown by protesters outside the The Aristotle University of Thessaloniki during clashes, Sunday, Dec. 7. Riots broke out Sunday in the Greek capital as demonstrators protested the fatal police shooting of a teenager in Athens the previous night. AP / Nikolas Giakoumidis



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Youths clash with riot police on Dec. 7, during a massive demonstration near the main police station in Athens following the deadly police shooting of a teenager late on Dec. 6 in the Greek capital. Andreas Grigoropoulos, 15, was shot by a police officer who opened fire after youths threw objects at his car. AFP / Getty Images / Louisa Gouliamaki



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Youths clash with riot police on Dec. 7, during a massive demonstration near the main police station in Athens following the deadly police shooting of a teenager late on Dec. 6 in the Greek capital. AFP / Getty Images / Louisa Gouliamaki



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An elderly couple passes a burning Emporiki Bank branch, background, during clashes in central Athens on Sunday, Dec. 7. AP / Thanassis Stavrakis



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Riot police try to exstinguish a car which is on fire outside the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki during clashes with protestors Sunday, Dec. 7. Riots broke out Sunday in the Greek capital as demonstrators protested the fatal police shooting of a teenager in Athens the previous night. AP / Nikolas Giakoumidis



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A firefighter is seen in front of a burning Emporiki Bank branch during clashes in central Athens on Sunday, Dec. 7. AP / Thanassis Stavrakis



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Protesters throw stones at riot police during clashes in central Athens on Sunday, Dec. 7. Youths hurled firebombs, rocks and other objects at riot police, who responded with tear gas. AP / Thanassis Stavrakis



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A Ford dealership burns during clashes in central Athens on Sunday, Dec. 7. Riots broke out Sunday in the Greek capital as demonstrators protested the fatal police shooting of a teenager in Athens the previous night. AP / Thanassis Stavrakis



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A man drives a motorcycle next to a burning garbage container in the northern port city of Thessaloniki, Greece, Sunday, Dec. 7. Protest marches in Greece's two major cities - the capital Athens and the northern city of Thessaloniki - turned violent Saturday night as thousands of rioters threw rocks and firebombs, smashing shops and setting fire to banks and public buildings. AP / Nikolas Giakoumidis



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Protesters throw a chair and fire bombs towards riot police during clashes in the northern port city of Thessaloniki, Greece, on Sunday, Dec. 7. AP / Nikolas Giakoumidis



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Protesters throw objects towards riot police during clashes in the northern port city of Thessaloniki, Greece, on Sunday, Dec. 7. AP / Nikolas Giakoumidis



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A fire bomb burns next to riot police as one of them throws a stun grenade, in the northern port city of Thessaloniki, Greece, Sunday, Dec. 7. AP / Nikolas Giakoumidis



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Smoke rises from a burnt-out sports department store in Athens, Sunday, Dec. 7. Hundreds of rioters are fighting pitched battles with police in the cities of Athens and Thessaloniki following the fatal shooting of a 16-year-old boy in central Athens Saturday night. At least 21 shops were damaged over a three-block section of the street, off Athens' famed Syntagma Square. Many shops had their doors blown away and were left wide open, although there was no sign of looting. AP / Thanassis Stavrakis



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A burned mannequin is seen outside a damaged clothes shop as riot police officers patrol at Ermou street in central Athens, Greece, early Sunday, Dec. 7. AP / Petros Giannakouris



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A riot police officer looks on a damaged window display of a clothes shop in Ermou street in central Athens, Greece, early Sunday, Dec. 7. AP / Petros Giannakouris



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Riot police pass by burnt out cars outside the National Technical University School of Athens early Sunday, Dec. 7. AP / Thanassis Stavrakis



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Riot police officers clash with students during a protest in central Athens on Dec. 4. Hundreds of students protested in Athens against the government's recent reforms of state universities. AFP / Getty Images / Aris Messinis



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