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August 31, 2009
California Wildfires
A wildfire in the mountains north of Los Angeles nearly doubled in size overnight and continues to threaten a broadcasting antenna complex and thousands of homes. Spokeswoman Dianne Cahir said the fire had burned 134 square miles of brush and trees by early Monday. At least 18 homes have burned and 12,000 are threatened in a 20-mile stretch from Pasadena to Acton. Two firefighters died when their vehicle rolled down a mountain.
In the Sierra foothills town of Auburn, more than 60 structures -- many of them homes -- were destroyed in a fast-moving fire, officials said. CalFire spokesman Daniel Berlant said Sunday it is unclear how many of the burned structures were homes and how many were industrial buildings, and it was likely to remain uncertain until daylight. The fire broke out at about 2:40 p.m. Sunday and had burned some 275 acres. (21 images)

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A United States Forest Service air tanker drops fire retardant next to a line of fire as the Station fire burns in the hills above a home in Acton, Calif. on Sunday, Aug. 30. AP / Dan Steinberg


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A helicopter drops water on hot spots while fighting the Station Fire Aug. 30, in Acton, Calif. The out of control Station Fire has burned more than 35,000 acres and is burning towards homes from Pasadena to the Antelope Valley. Getty Images / Justin Sullivan



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A Los Angeles County fire fighter sprays water on burning trees as he fights the Station Fire Aug. 30, in Acton, Calif. The out of control Station Fire has burned more than 35,000 acres and is burning towards homes from Pasadena to the Antelope Valley. Getty Images / Justin Sullivan



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Los Angeles County fire fighters mop up hot spots as they fight the Station Fire Aug. 30, in Acton, Calif.Getty Images / Justin Sullivan



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Los Angeles County fire fighters mop up hot spots as they fight the Station Fire Aug. 30, in Acton, Calif. Getty Images / Justin Sullivan



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A Los Angeles County fire fighter monitors hot spots as he fights the Station Fire Aug. 30, in Acton, Calif. Getty Images / Justin Sullivan



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Spot fires glow after the Station Fire burned through Aug. 30, in Acton, Calif. Getty Images / Justin Sullivan



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Los Angeles County fire fighters Kevin Klar, right, Eric Tucker, center, and homeowner Henrik Hairapetian, who stayed behind to protect his home, are illuminated by the glow of the Station Fire as it scorches a hillside on Bristow Drive in the La Canada Flintridge foothills on Aug. 29, above Los Angeles, Calif. Getty Images / Kevork Djansezian



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Los Angeles County Sheriff deputies and residents help evacuate horses as the Station fire burns in the hills above Acton, Calif. on Sunday, Aug. 30. AP / Dan Steinberg



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Residents help Roberto Bombalier evacuate a 2-year-old horse on foot as the Station fire burning in the Angeles National Forest above Acton, Calif. on Sunday, Aug. 30. The horse had not been trained for trailer travel yet. AP / Jason Redmond



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A woman carries personal belongings while evacuating her home as the Station Fire burns through the Angeles National Forest towards her home Aug. 30, in Acton, Calif. Getty Images / Justin Sullivan



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A Fire Chief from El Dorado County in Northern California waits as flames from the Station Fire blows over Aliso Canyon Road near Acton, Calif., Sunday, Aug. 30. AP / Mike Meadows



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The remains of burned cars and structures are seen after a fire hit the area on Friday, Aug. 28, in Soledad, Calif. Hundreds of residents near Soledad remain evacuated as firefighters battle a blaze that's also threatening Pinnacles National Monument. AP / The Californian / Richard Green



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In this photo taken from Monterey Park, smoke billows from a fire in the foothills above La Canada Flintridge, Calif. in the San Gabriel Valley Sunday Aug. 30. AP / Nick Ut



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Marla Gordon with her daughter Chaniah Gordon, 12, take a first look at their home which was destroyed in in the Auburn fire on Sunday, Aug. 30. The Sacramento Bee / Bryan Patrick



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A firefighter works on the blaze at the the Auburn fire on Cedar Mist Lane in Auburn, Calif. on Sunday, Aug. The Sacramento Bee / Bryan Patrick



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Ema Lujan carries a hose to help firefighters save what's left of her Harley Davidson business destroyed in the Auburn fire in Auburn, Calif. The Sacramento Bee / Bryan Patrick



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A resident walks along homes burned in the Auburn fire on Aug. 30 in Auburn, Calif. The Sacramento Bee / Bryan Patrick



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Rachel Varquez, left, who's house burned down on Creekside Place is comforted by neighbor Coleen Beldner in Auburn, Calif. on Sunday. The Sacramento Bee / Bryan Patrick



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Lyle Swesey sits in a lawn chair across the street from his burned down home on Creekside Place in Auburn, Calif., Sunday Aug. 30, as a helicopter drops water on hots spots. The Sacramento Bee / Bryan Patrick



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Marla Gordon holds her daughters as they looked at their burned down home on Oak Mist Lane in Auburn, Calif. The Sacramento Bee / Bryan Patrick



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