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February 10, 2010
Poverty in Cambodia
Poverty in Cambodia is rife due to years of terrorism and civil war and corruption within the government. Forced evictions also have had an impact on the numbers of families living on the streets. While Cambodia is on a path to greater economic development, poverty is still widespread with 40 percent of the population living under the poverty line according to various UN agencies. Getty Images photographer Paula Bronstein provides an intimate look at poverty in the capital city of Phnom Penh. (22 images)

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Cambodian mother Vourn and her baby Koav beg for money from tourists on Feb. 5, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein


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A mother sits on the street with her baby on Feb. 6, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. They sleep on the streets along with about 30 other families who survive by begging, collecting garbage and selling food. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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A mother feeds her baby while another one sleeps in the family cart Feb. 6, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. They sleep on the streets along with about 30 other families who survive by begging, collecting garbage and selling food. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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A Cambodian woman offers prayer to a foreigner while asking for money on Feb. 7, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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A mother plays with her baby while living on the streets in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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Chamaroun, 24, center, lives on the streets with his wife and child, he has been addicted to sniffing shoe glue since 1997. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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Cambodian children living in a cart wait while their mother fetches water as another girl pushes her drink cart down the streets of the capital city Feb. 6, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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Sinal, 3, hangs out on the streets waiting for handouts as tourists walk to the National Museum on Feb. 7, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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A Cambodian boy sleeps away the afternoon on Feb. 7, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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Bross, a homeless man sleeps on the sidewalk alongside his son on Feb. 6, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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Cambodian mother Vourn and her baby Koav beg for money from tourists on Feb. 7, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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A Cambodian mother sits on the streets where she sleeps with her daughter on Feb. 4, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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After the shops close, a Cambodian boy collects garbage to make money on the streets on Feb. 4, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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A Cambodian woman collects garbage after the shops close. She makes little money, barely surviving on the streets of Phnom Penh, Cambodia.Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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A Cambodian woman collects garbage after the shops on Feb. 5, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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Mr.Pen, who is blind, and unemployed, sniffs shoe glue on Feb. 4 in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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Bross sniffs shoe glue on the streets of Phnom Penh, Cambodia. He sleeps on the streets along with about 30 other families who survive by begging, collecting garbage and selling food. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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A woman helps her friend inject heroin in a slum area on Feb. 6, in Phnom Penh. Impoverished Cambodia has become a popular trafficking point for narcotics, particularly methamphetamines and heroin, after neighboring Thailand toughened its stance on illegal drugs in 2002. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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A man injects heroin in a slum area Feb. 6, in Phnom Penh. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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A Drug addict gets help by Korsang's outreach team Feb. 6, in Phnom Penh. The non-governmental organization offers risk reduction and health services for drug users. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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A student at the Friends-International Mit Samlanh education center learns skills in a beauty salon class on Feb. 5, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Friends-International and their partner Mit Samlanh are non-governmental organizations working with marginalized youth, streets kids, drug users and victims of AIDS, providing them with comprehensive services enabling them access to education and vocational training. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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A student at the Friends-International Mit Samlanh education center practices hip hop dancing on Feb. 5, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



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