A photo blog of world events by Sacbee.com Assistant Director of Multimedia Tim Reese.
Subscribe to feed Subscribe to this blog's feed
February 22, 2010
Space shuttle Endeavour's mission to the space station
CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (AP) -- Space shuttle Endeavour and its six astronauts closed out the last major construction mission at the International Space Station with a smooth landing in darkness that struck many as bittersweet. Only one flight remains for Endeavour, the baby of the shuttle fleet. Overall, just four missions remain.
During the two-week, 5.7 million-mile (9.2 million-kilometer) journey, commander George Zamka and his crew delivered and installed a new space station room, Tranquility, and a big bay window with commanding views of Earth. Their success resulted in the virtual completion of the space station, described by NASA as 98 percent finished. (18 images)

Follow The Frame on Twitter at sacbee_theframe

This image provided by NASA shows the silhouette of the space shuttle Endeavour in a very unique setting over Earth's colorful horizon photographed by an Expedition 22 crew member prior to STS-130 rendezvous and docking operations with the International Space Station Tuesday Feb. 9. AP / NASA


shuttle02.jpg
Guests watch from the terrace of the Operations Support Building II as space shuttle Endeavour launches from pad 39A on the STS-130 mission early Monday, Feb. 8, at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. AP / NASA / Paul E. Alers



shuttle03.jpg
An orbital sunrise is featured in this image photographed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Soichi Noguchi, Expedition 22 flight engineer, from a window in the newly-installed Cupola of the International Space Station while space shuttle Endeavour remains docked with the station Thursday Feb. 18. A Russian Progress spacecraft, docked to the Pirs Docking Compartment, is visible at right. AP / NASA



shuttle04.jpg
The space shuttle Endeavour intersects the thin line of Earth's atmosphere photographed by an crew member while Endeavour remains docked with the International Space Station Wednesday Feb. 17. AP / NASA



shuttle05.jpg
Astronaut Nicholas Patrick participates in extravehicular activity as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the spacewalk, Patrick and fellow astronaut Robert Behnken removed insulation blankets and launch restraint bolts from each of the Cupola's seven windows. AP / NASA



shuttle06.jpg
Astronaut Nicholas Patrick participates in the first session of extravehicular activity on Feb. 11, as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. AP / NASA



shuttle07.jpg
Astronaut Robert Behnken participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station, Sunday, Feb. 14. AP / NASA



shuttle08.jpg
Backdropped by Earth's horizon and the blackness of space, a portion of the International Space Station is featured in this image provided by NASA and photographed by a crew member on the International Space Station while space shuttle Endeavour was docked with the station Monday Feb. 15. AP / NASA



shuttle09.jpg
The Tranquility module is transferred from its stowage position in space shuttle Endeavour's payload bay to its position on the port side of the Unity node of the International Space Station. AP / NASA



shuttle10.jpg
The Russian Soyuz and Progress spacecrafts, docked to the International Space Station Wednesday Feb. 17. AP / NASA



shuttle11.jpg
The view of the port side of space shuttle Endeavour's cargo bay is recorded with a digital still camera shortly after separation from the International Space Station, Saturday, Feb. 20. AP / NASA



shuttle12.jpg
A head-on view of space shuttle Endeavour's crew cabin, photographed by one of the Expedition 22 crew members aboard the International Space Station prior to docking with the International Space Station Tuesday, Feb. 9. AP / NASA



shuttle13.jpg
A partial view of the crew cabin and forward payload bay of the space shuttle Endeavour during a survey of the approaching vehicle prior to docking with the International Space Station Tuesday Feb. 9. AP / NASA



shuttle14.jpg
The Tranquility node in space shuttle Endeavour's payload bay, vertical stabilizer, orbital maneuvering system pods and docking mechanism backdropped by mountainous terrain, photographed by an STS-130 crew member from an aft flight deck window Monday Feb. 9. AP / NASA



shuttle15.jpg
Nicholas Patrick, STS-130 mission specialist, is pictured in a window of the newly-installed Cupola of the International Space Station while space shuttle Endeavour remained docked with the station on Thursday, Feb. 18. AP / NASA



shuttle16.jpg
An image taken through a first of its kind "bay window" on the International Space Station, the seven-windowed Cupola early Wednesday morning Feb. 17. The Cupola, which a week and half ago was brought up to the orbital outpost by the crew on the space shuttle Endeavour, will house controls for the station robotics and will be a location where crew members can operate the robotic arms and monitor other exterior activities. AP / NASA



shuttle17.jpg
The International Space Station photographed by an STS-130 crew member as space shuttle Endeavour and the space station approach each other during rendezvous and docking activities on Feb. 9. AP / NASA



shuttle18.jpg
The space shuttle Endeavour STS-130 lands at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Feb. 21. AFP / Getty Images / Jim Watson



About Comments

Reader comments on Sacbee.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Sacramento Bee. If you see an objectionable comment, click the "report abuse" button below it. We will delete comments containing inappropriate links, obscenities, hate speech, and personal attacks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. See more about comments here.

What You Should Know About Comments on Sacbee.com

Sacbee.com is happy to provide a forum for reader interaction, discussion, feedback and reaction to our stories. However, we reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments or ban users who can't play nice. (See our full terms of service here.)

Here are some rules of the road:

• Keep your comments civil. Don't insult one another or the subjects of our articles. If you think a comment violates our guidelines click the "report abuse" button to notify the moderators. Responding to the comment will only encourage bad behavior.

• Don't use profanities, vulgarities or hate speech. This is a general interest news site. Sometimes, there are children present. Don't say anything in a way you wouldn't want your own child to hear.

• Do not attack other users; focus your comments on issues, not individuals.

• Stay on topic. Only post comments relevant to the article at hand. If you want to discuss an issue with a specific user, click on his profile name and send him a direct message.

• Do not copy and paste outside material into the comment box.

• Don't repeat the same comment over and over. We heard you the first time.

• Do not use the commenting system for advertising. That's spam and it isn't allowed.

• Don't use all capital letters. That's akin to yelling and not appreciated by the audience.

You should also know that The Sacramento Bee does not screen comments before they are posted. You are more likely to see inappropriate comments before our staff does, so we ask that you click the "report abuse" button to submit those comments for moderator review. You also may notify us via email at feedback@sacbee.com. Note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us the profile name of the user who made the comment. Remember, comment moderation is subjective. You may find some material objectionable that we won't and vice versa.

If you submit a comment, the user name of your account will appear along with it. Users cannot remove their own comments once they have submitted them, but you may ask our staff to retract one of your comments by sending an email to feedback@sacbee.com. Again, make sure you note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us your profile name.

hide comments

On October 14, The Sacramento Bee will temporarily remove commenting from sacbee.com. While we design the upgrade, we encourage you to tell us what you like and don't like about commenting on sacbee.com and other websites. We've heard from hundreds of you already and we're listening. Please continue to add your thoughts and questions here. We also encourage you to write Letters to the Editor on this and other topics.