A photo blog of world events by Sacbee.com Assistant Director of Multimedia Tim Reese.
Subscribe to feed Subscribe to this blog's feed
May 18, 2010
Deadly mayhem grips Bangkok
BANGKOK (AP) -- The Thai government rejected a proposal Tuesday for peace talks with leaders of the Red Shirt protesters to end the deadly mayhem gripping Bangkok, saying negotiations cannot start until the demonstrators disperse. The decision set back hopes of stemming the crisis after six days of violence that has left 38 people dead and destabilized a country once regarded as one of Southeast Asia's strongest democracies. Thousands of anti-government Red Shirts, many rural poor, remain camped behind barricades to press their demand for quick national elections. Their sympathizers battled soldiers in nearby streets. (29 images)

Follow The Frame on Twitter at sacbee_theframe

An anti-government protester 'Red Shirt' throws a tire toward a burning truck as the violence in central Bangkok continues on May 16, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. So far at least 154 have been injured and over 20 killed in the clashes as the military and the government launched an operation to disperse anti-government protesters who have closed parts of the city for two months. A state of emergency is in effect that spreads to 17 provinces in the country. The Thai army declared certain protest areas where clashes are taking place as a "Live Fire Zone." Getty Images / Athit Perawongmetha


red_shirt02.jpg
An anti-government protester fires a firecracker loaded in a slingshot at Thai military forces during street clashes as the violence in central part of the city escalates on May 15, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. Getty Images / Andy Nelson



red_shirt03.jpg
A Red Shirt anti-government protester lights a firework on his sling-shot on the Rama 4 road in Bangkok on May 18, 2010. The Thai government said there would be no negotiations with protesters in the capital until they end their crippling rally, after a Senate offer to mediate crisis talks. AFP / Getty Images / Manan Vatsyayana



red_shirt04.jpg
An anti-government protester 'Red Shirt' kneels down as he runs away from the gunfire as the violence in central Bangkok continues on May 16, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. Getty Images / Athit Perawongmetha



red_shirt05.jpg
A red shirt anti-government protester receives help from others after being shot in the head as the violence in central Bangkok continues on May 17, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. Getty Images / Athit Perawongmetha



red_shirt06.jpg
A Red Shirt anti-government protester fires a sling-shot towards security officers on the Rama 4 road in Bangkok on May 18, 2010. AFP / Getty Images / Manan Vatsyayana



red_shirt07.jpg
A protester shouts in the direction of soldiers manning a post, using a plastic road divider, as other look on, in Bangkok, Thailand,Tuesday, May 18, 2010. AP / Manish Swarup



red_shirt08.jpg
An anti-government protester fires a slingshot at Thai soldiers on Sunday May 16, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. The country imposed a curfew Sunday and sent Red Cross workers to evacuate women and children from Bangkok's deadly protest zone. AP / Vincent Yu



red_shirt09.jpg
Anti-government protesters take cover as others run out during a standoff with Thai soldiers at an intersection on Saturday May 15, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. AP / Wong Maye-E



red_shirt10.jpg
A Thai anti-government red shirt protester throws wood onto a fire on a major Bangkok street as clashes continued on May 17, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. Getty Images



red_shirt11.jpg
An anti-government protester composes himself after witnessing a man being shot on Saturday May 15, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. AP / Wong Maye-E



red_shirt13.jpg
Local Thais watch anti-government protesters from a behind a barricade at a stand off with Thai military, Sunday, May 16, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. AP / Wally Santana



red_shirt14.jpg
A Thai anti-government red shirt protester sleeps at a barricade as violence continued on May 17, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. Getty Images



red_shirt15.jpg
A broken window in a burned out shop is seen as a redshirt protester runs by as violence continues on May 16, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



red_shirt16.jpg
An anti-government protester 'Red Shirt' throws a molotov cocktail toward Thai security forces as the violence in central Bangkok continues on May 16, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. Getty Images / Athit Perawongmetha



red_shirt17.jpg
Anti-government protester 'Red Shirt' fires a homemade fire cracker toward Thai security forces as the violence in central Bangkok continues on May 16, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. Getty Images / Athit Perawongmetha



red_shirt18.jpg
Thai demonstrators use an improvised passage to move from street to street in an area of clashes with the army in downtown Bangkok on May 18, 2010. AFP / Getty Images / Pedro Ugarte



red_shirt19.jpg
A Red Shirt anti-government protester uses binoculars to look at soldiers on the Rama 4 road in Bangkok on May 18, 2010. AFP / Getty Images / Manan Vatsyayana



red_shirt20.jpg
A resident runs in a street near Ding Daeng intersection in Bangkok on May 17, 2010. AFP / Getty Images / Nicolas Asfouri



red_shirt21.jpg
Thai men move the body of a man killed during clashes between demonstrators and security forces in Bangkok on May 15, 2010. AFP / Getty Images / Pedro Ugarte



red_shirt22.jpg
A Thai Red-Shirt anti-government protester runs with a jerry-can after setting tires on fire on Rama IV road in Bangkok on May 18, 2010. AFP / Getty Images / Manan Vatsyayana



red_shirt23.jpg
Soldiers arrest red shirt anti-government protesters as violence in central Bangkok escalates on May 14, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



red_shirt24.jpg
A Thai soldier rests during a clash with anti-government red shirt protesters during continuing street violence on May 16, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. Getty Images



red_shirt25.jpg
A Thai soldier looks through binoculars in Bangkok, Thailand, Monday, May 17, 2010. AP / Wason Wanichakorn



red_shirt26.jpg
A Thai soldier takes his position on Monday, May 17, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. AP / Wason Wanichakorn



red_shirt27.jpg
Supporters of Maj. Gen. Khattiya Sawasdiphol pay last respects at his funeral Monday, May 17, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. Sawasdiphol, the military strategist of the Red Shirts succumbed Monday to a gunshot wound from a sniper attack last week. Red Shirts offered peace talks Monday to end raging street battles in Bangkok as a government deadline demanding the demonstrators vacate a protest zone passed without capitulation. AP / Vincent Yu



red_shirt28.jpg
A monk visits with Thai anti-government red shirt protesters at a major clash point as violence continued on May 17, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. Getty Images



red_shirt29.jpg
Thai Buddhist monks gather Sunday, May 16, 2010, at Victory Monument in Bangkok, Thailand to chant prayers for peace. AP / David Longstreath



red_shirt30.jpg
Thai monks lead a prayer with Red shirt protesters inside the Rachprasong red's encampment as the government deadline passes for the remaining protesters to leave May 17, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein



About Comments

Reader comments on Sacbee.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Sacramento Bee. If you see an objectionable comment, click the "report abuse" button below it. We will delete comments containing inappropriate links, obscenities, hate speech, and personal attacks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. See more about comments here.

What You Should Know About Comments on Sacbee.com

Sacbee.com is happy to provide a forum for reader interaction, discussion, feedback and reaction to our stories. However, we reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments or ban users who can't play nice. (See our full terms of service here.)

Here are some rules of the road:

• Keep your comments civil. Don't insult one another or the subjects of our articles. If you think a comment violates our guidelines click the "report abuse" button to notify the moderators. Responding to the comment will only encourage bad behavior.

• Don't use profanities, vulgarities or hate speech. This is a general interest news site. Sometimes, there are children present. Don't say anything in a way you wouldn't want your own child to hear.

• Do not attack other users; focus your comments on issues, not individuals.

• Stay on topic. Only post comments relevant to the article at hand. If you want to discuss an issue with a specific user, click on his profile name and send him a direct message.

• Do not copy and paste outside material into the comment box.

• Don't repeat the same comment over and over. We heard you the first time.

• Do not use the commenting system for advertising. That's spam and it isn't allowed.

• Don't use all capital letters. That's akin to yelling and not appreciated by the audience.

You should also know that The Sacramento Bee does not screen comments before they are posted. You are more likely to see inappropriate comments before our staff does, so we ask that you click the "report abuse" button to submit those comments for moderator review. You also may notify us via email at feedback@sacbee.com. Note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us the profile name of the user who made the comment. Remember, comment moderation is subjective. You may find some material objectionable that we won't and vice versa.

If you submit a comment, the user name of your account will appear along with it. Users cannot remove their own comments once they have submitted them, but you may ask our staff to retract one of your comments by sending an email to feedback@sacbee.com. Again, make sure you note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us your profile name.

hide comments

On October 14, The Sacramento Bee will temporarily remove commenting from sacbee.com. While we design the upgrade, we encourage you to tell us what you like and don't like about commenting on sacbee.com and other websites. We've heard from hundreds of you already and we're listening. Please continue to add your thoughts and questions here. We also encourage you to write Letters to the Editor on this and other topics.