A photo blog of world events by Sacbee.com Assistant Director of Multimedia Tim Reese.
Subscribe to feed Subscribe to this blog's feed
June 18, 2010
Oil spill hits 60th day
NEW ORLEANS (AP) -- Saturday will mark 60 days since the explosion and sinking of the Deepwater Horizon and beginning of one of the worst oil spills in history. On Friday, signaling a shift in strategy to fight against the ruptured well in the Gulf, the Coast Guard began ramping up efforts to capture oil closer to shore. Adm. Thad Allen said an estimated 2,000 private boats in the so-called "vessels of opportunity" program will be more closely linked through a tighter command and control structure to direct them to locations less than 50 miles offshore to skim the oil. Allen, the point man for the federal response to the spill, previously had said surface containment efforts would be concentrated much farther offshore. Estimates of the oil being siphoned from the well a mile below the Gulf are growing. Allen said more than 1.2 million gallons was sucked up to containment vessels Thursday. (28 images)

Follow The Frame on Twitter at sacbee_theframe

Oil is burned and skimmed by boats near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Sunday, June 13, 2010, in the Gulf of Mexico. AP / Eric Gay


oil_day6002.jpg
Oil is burned and skimmed by boats near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Sunday, June 13, 2010, in the Gulf of Mexico. AP / Eric Gay



oil_day6003.jpg
Left: Oil is burned and skimmed by boats near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Sunday, June 13, 2010, in the Gulf of Mexico. AP / Eric Gay
Right: Oil is burned on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico a few miles from the site of the Deepwater Horizon disaster Wednesday, June 16, 2010. Oil is still leaking from the wellhead. AP / Dave Martin



oil_day6004.jpg
Oil is burned on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico a few miles from the site of the Deepwater Horizon disaster Wednesday, June 16, 2010. Oil is still leaking from the wellhead. AP / Dave Martin



oil_day6005.jpg
An oil slick is near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill contrasts with the water in the Gulf of Mexico Sunday, June 13, 2010. Oil continues to flow from the wellhead some 5,000 feet below the surface. AP / Dave Martin



oil_day6006.jpg
Boats are seen along the oil damaged shoreline in the northern reaches of Barataria Bay Thursday, June 17, 2010. AP / Gerald Herbert



oil_day6007.jpg
A boat glides through the heavy sheen of oil as it skims near the site of the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico Sunday, June 13, 2010. AP / Dave Martin



oil_day6008.jpg
The oil damaged shoreline in the Northern reaches of Barataria Bay is seen amidst work boats in oil polluted waters as Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal's tours oil damage in Barataria Bay, La., Thursday, June 17, 2010. AP / Gerald Herbert



oil_day6009.jpg
A member of Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal's staff stirs thick oil on the water's surface in the Northern regions of Barataria Bay in Plaquemines Parish, La., Tuesday, June 15, 2010. AP / Gerald Herbert



oil_day6010.jpg
A contract clean-up worker uses a hose to collect oil in Bay Jimmy on June 15, 2010 off of Grand Isle, La. Getty Images / Spencer Platt



oil_day6011.jpg
A worker hauls away a load of garbage bags filled with oil soaked boom on the beach on June 14, 2010 in Gulf Shores, Alabama. Getty Images / Chris Graythen



oil_day6012.jpg
An oil-soaked boom is seen near the base of a fishing pier on June 14, 2010 in Gulf Shores, Ala. Getty Images / Chris Graythen



oil_day6013.jpg
Oil cleanup crews make their morning patrol along the beach in Gulf Shores, Ala., Wednesday, June 16, 2010. New waves of oil have not come ashore and cleanup work continues, leaving Alabama's beaches in much better condition than just a few days earlier. AP / Dave Martin



oil_day6014.jpg
Oil cleanup workers hired by BP clean oily deposits from the shore in Orange Beach, Ala., Saturday, June 12, 2010. AP / Dave Martin



oil_day6015.jpg
A cleanup worker pauses while vacuuming oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill along the Northern shores of Barataria Bay in Plaquemines Parish, La., Tuesday, June 15, 2010. AP / Gerald Herbert



oil_day6016.jpg
A worker on a staging barge walks past piles of absorbent boom to be used to collect oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill Thursday, June 17, 2010, near Myrtle Grove, La. AP / Charlie Neibergall



oil_day6017.jpg
Sal Gagliano stands on the bow of his boat with his son Dominic, right, as they look at water containing oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in Bay Jimmy Thursday, June 17, 2010, near Myrtle Grove, La. AP / Charlie Neibergall



oil_day6018.jpg
Oil cleanup workers gather for duty in Orange Beach, Ala., Wednesday morning, June 16, 2010. Press-Register / Mike Kittrell



oil_day6019.jpg
A worker's boots are decontaminated during clean up from the Deepwater Horizon spill, Sunday, June 13, 2010, in Grand Isle, La. AP / Eric Gay



oil_day6020.jpg
Dead fish in a clump of oil, which were part of a larger fish kill and placed in foil by Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries personnel, are seen in oil impacted areas of the Northern shores of Barataria Bay in Plaquemines Parish, La., Tuesday, June 15, 2010. AP / Gerald Herbert



oil_day6021.jpg
A loggerhead turtle, 6 to 7 years old and more than 100 pounds, evades the net of a team of sea turtle experts while swimming in the polluted waters of the Gulf of Mexico, near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Los Angeles Times / Carolyn Cole



oil_day6022.jpg
A team of sea turtle experts work to recover oiled and endangered turtles in the Gulf of Mexico, near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on Monday, June 14, 2010. Oil collects in areas of sargassum, a type of seaweed, where immature turtles and many other organisms live. Los Angeles Times / Carolyn Cole



oil_day6023.jpg
A pelican flies over an oil slick boom off of Bird Island Two on June 14, 2010 in Grand Isle, La. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, some 1,282 oiled birds have been captured in time to be treated with the intention of eventually releasing them back into the wild. Getty Images / Spencer Platt



oil_day6024.jpg
A brown pelican covered with oil from the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, eludes capture by a team of biologists from the US Fish and Wildlife Service at Sandy Point in the Gulf of Mexico, near Venice, La., June 15, 2010. Birds are caught and then cleaned at the Fort Jackson Oiled Wildlife Rehabilitation Center. AFP / Getty Images / Saul Loeb



oil_day6025.jpg
A team of biologists from the US Fish and Wildlife Service catch a brown pelican covered with oil from the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, at Sandy Point in the Gulf of Mexico, near Venice, La., June 15, 2010. Birds are caught and then cleaned at the Fort Jackson Oiled Wildlife Rehabilitation Center. AFP / Getty Images / Saul Loeb



oil_day6026.jpg
Two egrets search for food in a canal beside an oil contaminated beach June 14, 2010 in Grand Isle, Louisiana. Oil producer BP said today that it plans to sell recovered oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, with profits going toward a wildlife protection fund. Getty Images / Spencer Platt



oil_day6027.jpg
Protestors stand behind BP CEO Tony Hayward, as he arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 17, 2010, to testify before the House Oversight and Investigations subcommittee hearing on "the role of BP in the Deepwater Horizon Explosion and oil spill. AP / Haraz N. Ghanbari



About Comments

Reader comments on Sacbee.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Sacramento Bee. If you see an objectionable comment, click the "report abuse" button below it. We will delete comments containing inappropriate links, obscenities, hate speech, and personal attacks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. See more about comments here.

What You Should Know About Comments on Sacbee.com

Sacbee.com is happy to provide a forum for reader interaction, discussion, feedback and reaction to our stories. However, we reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments or ban users who can't play nice. (See our full terms of service here.)

Here are some rules of the road:

• Keep your comments civil. Don't insult one another or the subjects of our articles. If you think a comment violates our guidelines click the "report abuse" button to notify the moderators. Responding to the comment will only encourage bad behavior.

• Don't use profanities, vulgarities or hate speech. This is a general interest news site. Sometimes, there are children present. Don't say anything in a way you wouldn't want your own child to hear.

• Do not attack other users; focus your comments on issues, not individuals.

• Stay on topic. Only post comments relevant to the article at hand. If you want to discuss an issue with a specific user, click on his profile name and send him a direct message.

• Do not copy and paste outside material into the comment box.

• Don't repeat the same comment over and over. We heard you the first time.

• Do not use the commenting system for advertising. That's spam and it isn't allowed.

• Don't use all capital letters. That's akin to yelling and not appreciated by the audience.

You should also know that The Sacramento Bee does not screen comments before they are posted. You are more likely to see inappropriate comments before our staff does, so we ask that you click the "report abuse" button to submit those comments for moderator review. You also may notify us via email at feedback@sacbee.com. Note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us the profile name of the user who made the comment. Remember, comment moderation is subjective. You may find some material objectionable that we won't and vice versa.

If you submit a comment, the user name of your account will appear along with it. Users cannot remove their own comments once they have submitted them, but you may ask our staff to retract one of your comments by sending an email to feedback@sacbee.com. Again, make sure you note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us your profile name.

hide comments

On October 14, The Sacramento Bee will temporarily remove commenting from sacbee.com. While we design the upgrade, we encourage you to tell us what you like and don't like about commenting on sacbee.com and other websites. We've heard from hundreds of you already and we're listening. Please continue to add your thoughts and questions here. We also encourage you to write Letters to the Editor on this and other topics.