A photo blog of world events by Sacbee.com Assistant Director of Multimedia Tim Reese.
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June 17, 2010
Spring floods around the globe
Spring floodwaters are wreaking havoc in many locations around the world this month. The most disasterous flooding came on Wednesday in France when flash floods hit the back hills of the French Riviera and turned streets into rivers of surging, muddy water. The death toll from the flooding has risen to 25.
In Myanmar and Bangladesh, floods and landslides triggered by incessant monsoon rains have killed more than 100 people, officials said Thursday. In the United States, flooding in Texas, Nebraska and Wyoming has caused massive damage to farms and homes. (25 images)

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Buses from Rockin' "R" River Rides lie on their sides, Wednesday June 9, 2010 wrapped around trees along the banks of the Guadalupe River in the Gruene Historic District in New Braunfels, Texas. The Gaudalupe River in the area is a popular water recreation destination known for inner tube float trips. San Antonio Express-News / Tom Reel


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A man takes pictures of piled up cars in Draguignan, southern France, Wednesday June 16, 2010. Regional authorities in southeastern France say more than a dozen people have been killed and many are missing in the aftermath of flash floods that followed powerful rainstorms. Unusually heavy rains recently in the Var region have transformed streets into muddy rivers that swept up trees, cars and other objects. AP / Lionel Cironneau



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A aerial view taken on June 16, 2010 in the French south eastern city of Puget-sur-Argens shows caravans in flooded wineyards in the aftermath of flooding in this area. At least 19 people have been killed by flash floods in Draguignan and in the neighboring city of Le Luc, caused by heavy rains. AFP / Getty Images / Gerard Julien



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Residents walk past piled cars, in Trans en Provence, southern France, Wednesday, June 16, 2010 after floods. AP / Claude Paris



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A couple leave the camping site in Le Muy, southern France, Wednesday, June 16, 2010 after flash floods. AP / Lionel Cironneau



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Damaged cars pile up in Draguignan, southern France, Wednesday, June 16, 2010. AP / Lionel Cironneau



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Rescue workers look for survivors or victims in the Naturby river after the deadly floods, Thursday, June 17, 2010, in Draguignan, southern France. AP / Claude Paris



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A aerial view taken on June 16, 2010 in the French south eastern city of Puget-sur-Argens shows damaged houses in the aftermath of flooding in this area. At least 19 people have been killed by flash floods in Draguignan and in the neighboring city of Le Luc, caused by heavy rains. AFP / Getty Images / Gerard Julien



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People walk by damaged cars in the aftermath of flooding in a western district of the French south eastern city of Draguignan on June 16, 2010. At least eleben people have been killed by flash floods in Draguignan and in the neighboring city of Luc, caused by heavy rains. AFP / Getty Images / Stephane Danna



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Men punting on a boat in the flooded village of Wilkow southern Poland, Monday, June 7, 2010. A second wave of flooding in a matter of three weeks is hitting Poland after heavy rains in the south. AP / Alik Keplicz



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Hieronim Haracz, 2nd right, evacuates his family from their flooded house in Mielec, southern Poland, where the Wisloka River has reached unusually high levels on Saturday, June 5, 2010. AP / Krzysztof Lokaj



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Residents of Bhitshah, board a Pakistan Navy boat to be transported, Saturday, June 5, 2010. Authorities in coastal regions of Pakistan are preparing for high winds and possible flooding and destruction from an approaching tropical storm. AP / Shakil Adil



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Caption13



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A Chinese woman mourns her family member killed by the flash floods in Nanping, east China's Fujian Province, Tuesday June 15, 2010. Dozens of people are missing after flash floods and landslides triggered by heavy rains engulfed two vehicles in Fujian, according to state media. AP



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A Chinese resident tries to move through floodwaters triggered by rainstorms in Wuzhou in southwest China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region on Wednesday, June 9, 2010. China's rainy season, which began last month, follows the worst drought in a century for southern China's Yunnan, Guizhou and Guangxi regions.AP



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Cars are stranded on roads which were flooded by rain water along the main commercial area on Wednesday June 16, 2010 in Singapore which has been experiencing unusually wet weather for the past week. AP / Jeffry Lim



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People stand on a stairway and watch Singapore Civil Defense Force officers wade through rain water which flooded a basement shopping area and coffee shop on Wednesday June 16, 2010 in Singapore which has been experiencing unusually wet weather for the past week.



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Cattle stand in floodwater in a feedlot near Wisner, Neb., Wednesday, June 16, 2010. An unknown number of farmsteads and homes on the edges of towns along the Elkhorn, Platte and other rivers have been damaged in recent days, and there have been many road and bridge closures and damage in a large swath of the state. Officials don't yet have an estimate of the damage, but 60 of the state's 93 counties are expected to request help cleaning up after heavy storms this month. AP / Nati Harnik



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A wide swath of land is flooded near Plattsmouth, Neb., where the Platte River flows into the Missouri River, Wednesday, June 16, 2010. AP / Nati Harnik



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A railroad bridge is down over the Elkhorn River near Norfolk, Neb., Wednesday, June 16, 2010. The swollen Elkhorn River crested two inches short of a levee protecting Norfolk, preventing further disaster as emergency workers Wednesday continued their search for a man who fell into the raging river after the bridge collapsed outside of town a day earlier. AP / Nati Harnik



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Cattle navigate a field which is flooded by the Elkhorn River near Beemer, Neb., Wednesday, June 16, 2010. The swollen Elkhorn River crested two inches short of a levee protecting Norfolk, preventing further disaster as emergency workers Wednesday continued their search for a man who fell into the raging river after a bridge collapsed outside of town a day earlier. AP / Nati Harnik



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A woman returns to her car after looking at a washed out road, in Norfolk, Neb., Wednesday, June 16, 2010. AP / Nati Harnik



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Three children stand at the edge of a flooded road in Oklahoma City, Monday, June 14, 2010. AP / Sue Ogrocki



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Cars are stranded and submerged by flood water in Oklahoma City, Okla. after heavy rain hit the area on Monday, June 14, 2010. AP / Alonzo Adams



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Tyler firefighter Steve Hickey carries Sara Munoz from her stalled car after it got stuck in rising water under the railroad bridge at Booner Street in Tyler, Texas on Thursday, June 10, 2010. Torrential rain caused flash flooding all over East Texas dumping over seven inches of rain in Smith County alone. Tyler Morning Telegraph / Jaime R. Carrero



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