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June 21, 2010
Summer solstice, Winter solstice
Thousands of New Agers and neo-pagans danced and whooped in delight Monday as a bright early morning sun rose above the ancient stone circle Stonehenge, marking the summer solstice. About 20,000 people crowded the prehistoric site on Salisbury Plain, southern England, to see the sunrise following an annual all-night party.

In the southern hemisphere, the winter solistice coincided with the celebration of the Aymara New Year in Tiwanaku, Bolivia, on Monday. The Aymara people, one of the largest indigenous groups in the region, celebrated their new year number 5,518 on the winter solstice, which marked the start of the new agricultural cycle.
(26 images)

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The sun is rising behind the Stonehenge monument in England, during the summer solstice shortly after 04:52 am, Monday, June 21, 2010. Thousands of New Agers and neo-pagans danced and whooped in delight Monday as a bright early morning sun rose above the ancient stone circle Stonehenge, marking the summer solstice. About 20,000 people crowded the prehistoric site on Salisbury Plain, southern England, to see the sunrise at 4:52 A.M. (11:52 EST), following an annual all-night party. AP / Lefteris Pitarakis


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People dance and play music as they wait for the sunrise during an all-night party to celebrate the summer solstice at the Stonehenge monument, England, early Monday, June 21, 2010. AP / Lefteris Pitarakis



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Revellers watch as the midsummer sun rises just after dawn over the megalithic monument of Stonehenge on June 21, 2010 on Salisbury Plain, England. Getty Images / Matt Cardy



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Solstice participants wait for the midsummer sun to rise over the megalithic monument of Stonehenge on June 20, 2010 on the edge of Salisbury Plain, west of Amesbury, England. Getty Images / Matt Cardy



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Bubbles float past as revellers watch as the midsummer sun rises just after dawn over the megalithic monument of Stonehenge on June 21, 2010 on Salisbury Plain, England. Getty Images / Matt Cardy



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People raise their hands meditating during the summer solstice shortly after 04.52 am at the Stonehenge monument, England, Monday , June 21, 2010. AP / Lefteris Pitarakis



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The sun rises behind Stonehenge as revellers celebrate the pagan festival of 'Summer Solstice' in Wiltshire in southern England, on June 21, 2010. The festival, which dates back thousands of years, celebrates the longest day of the year when the sun is at its maximum elevation. AFP / Getty Images / Carl Court



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Solstice participants conduct a Solstice sunset service as people gather in the megalithic monument of Stonehenge on June 20, 2010 on the edge of Salisbury Plain, west of Amesbury, England. Getty Images / Matt Cardy



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Druids conduct a Solstice sunset service as people gather in the megalithic monument of Stonehenge on June 20, 2010 on the edge of Salisbury Plain, west of Amesbury, England. Getty Images / Matt Cardy



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People wait for the sunrise to celebrate the summer solstice shortly before 04:52 am at the Stonehenge monument, England, Monday, June 21, 2010. AP / Lefteris Pitarakis



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People dance as they celebrate the summer solstice shortly after 04:52 am at the Stonehenge monument, England, early Monday, June 21, 2010. AP / Lefteris Pitarakis



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Revellers celebrate as the sun rises behind Stonehenge during the pagan festival 'Summer Solstice' in Wiltshire in southern England, on June 21, 2010. AFP / Getty Images / Carl Court



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Yoga enthusiasts participate in the free annual 'Summer Solstice in Times Square Yoga-thon' June 21, 2010 in New York City. The summer solstice is the first official day of summer and the longest day of the year. Getty Images / Mario Tama



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A pianist performs on June 21, 2010 in Nantes, as part of the annual music event, "La Fete de la Musique". Thousands of musicians took to the streets and stages across France today for one of the nation's most popular festivals celebrating rhythm and sound. Launched in 1982, the "Fete de la Musique" has spread to more than 100 countries where the festival held on the day of the summer solstice has taken off . AFP / Getty Images / Frank Perry



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A man ues a camera on a rocky crest filled with astronomical markers at the megalithic observatory of Kokino, soon after sunrise, early on June 21, 2010 -- the day of the summer solstice. The ancient astronomic observatory, about 80 kms northeast of Skopje, is more than 4,000 years old. Kokino includes special stone markers used to track the movement of Sun and Moon on the eastern horizon. AFP /Getty Images / Robert Atanasovski



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An Aymara female "yatiri" (priestess) waves a "huipala" (Andean flag) as part of the celebrations for the Aymara year 5518, during the winter solstice in Tiawanaku, 70 km from La Paz, Bolivia on June 21, 2010. AFP / Getty Images / Aizar Raldes



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Bolivian President Evo Morales (C), surrounded by Aymara "yatiris" (priests) and public, raises his arms to the Sun as part of the celebrations for the Aymara year 5518, during the winter solstice in Tiawanaku, 70 km from La Paz, Bolivia on June 21, 2010. AFP / Getty Images / Aizar Raldes



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Bolivian President Evo Morales (C) greets an Aymara "yatiri" (priestess) during the celebrations for the Aymara year 5518, during the winter solstice in Tiawanaku, 70 km from La Paz, June 21, 2010.AFP / Getty Images / Aizar Raldes



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Bolivian President Evo Morales (2nd-R) and several Aymara "yatiris" (priests) make offers to the "Pachamama" (Mother Earth) as part of the celebrations for the Aymara year 5518, during the winter solstice in Tiawanaku, 70 km from La Paz, June 21, 2010.AFP / Getty Images / Aizar Raldes



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Bolivian President Evo Morales (L) and several Aymara "yatiris" (priests) perform Andean rituals as part of the celebrations for the Aymara year 5518, during the winter solstice in Tiawanaku, 70 km from La Paz, June 21, 2010. AFP / Getty Images / Aizar Raldes



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Aymara "yatiris" (priests) and public raise their arms to the Sun as part of the celebrations for the Aymara year 5518, during the winter solstice in Tiawanaku, 70 km from La Paz, June 21, 2010.AFP / Getty Images / Aizar Raldes



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An Andean religious leader stands over a fire as he makes a spiritual offering during the celebrations of the Aymara New Year number 5,518 in Tiwanaku, Bolivia, Monday, June 21, 2010. The Aymara people, one of the largest indigenous groups in the region, celebrate their new year on the southern hemisphere's winter solstice, which marks the start of the new agricultural cycle.) AP / Juan Karita



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People celebrate the sun as it rises during the celebrations of the Aymara New Year number 5,518 in Tiwanaku, Bolivia, Monday, June 21, 2010. AP / Juan Karita



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A man celebrates the sun as it rises during the celebrations of the Aymara New Year number 5,518 in Tiwanaku, Bolivia, Monday, June 21, 2010. AP / Juan Karita



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An Aymara "yatiri" (priest) makes offers to the "Pachamama" (Mother Earth) as part of the celebrations for the Aymara year 5518, during the winter solstice in Tiawanaku, 70 km from La Paz, June 21, 2010. AFP / Getty Images / Aizar Raldes



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People celebrate the sun as it rises during the celebrations of the Aymara New Year number 5,518 in Tiwanaku, Bolivia, Monday, June 21, 2010. AP / Juan Karita



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