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July 29, 2010
Arizona's immigration enforcement law SB 1070
P HOENIX (AP) -- Arizona asked an appeals court Thursday to lift a judge's order blocking most of the state's immigration law as the city of Phoenix filled with protesters, including about 50 who were arrested for confronting officers in riot gear. Republican Gov. Jan Brewer called U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton's Wednesday decision halting the law "a bump in the road," and the state appealed to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco on Thursday. Outside the state Capitol, hundreds of protesters began marching at dawn, gathering in front of the federal courthouse where Bolton issued her ruling on Wednesday. They marched on to the office of Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who has made a crackdown on illegal immigration one of his signature issues. At least 32 demonstrators were arrested after blocking the entrance and beating on the large steel doors leading to the Maricopa County jail in downtown Phoenix. Sheriff's deputies in riot gear opened the doors and waded out into the crowd, hauling off those who didn't move. (30 images)

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A protester shouts at riot police at a demonstration against Arizona's immigration enforcement law SB 1070 on July 29, 2010 in Phoenix, Ariz. Getty Images / John Moore


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Protesters join hands as police block the street Thursday, July 29, 2010 in Phoenix during a rally against Arizona's new immigration law, SB1070. Opponents of Arizona's immigration crackdown went ahead with protests Thursday despite a judge's ruling that delayed enforcement of most the law. AP / Matt York



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Police arrest a protester during a demonstration against Arizona's immigration enforcement law SB 1070 on July 29, 2010 in Phoenix, Ariz. Protesters blocked a main downtown street in a show of civil disobedience to show opposition to the new law and riot police responded with arrests. Getty Images / John Moore



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Sheriff's deputies detain protesters who chained themselves together outside the offices of controversial Maricopa county sheriff Joe Arpaio in Phoenix on July 29, 2010. AFP/ Getty Images / Mark Ralston



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Anti SB1070 protesters are arrested after staging a sit-in and blocking 1st Avenue in downtown Phoenix on July 29, 2010. AFP/ Getty Images / Mark Ralston



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With the Statue of Liberty behind them, a coalition of immigrant groups and their supporters march in the hundreds across the Brooklyn Bridge, Thursday July 29, 2010, in New York. AP / Seth Wenig



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A coalition of immigrant groups and their supporters march in the hundreds across the Brooklyn Bridge, Thursday July 29, 2010, in New York. Protesters are calling for the full repeal of Arizona's immigration law, saying it fuels a climate of racism. AP / Bebeto Matthews



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A coalition of immigrant groups and their supporters march across the Brooklyn Bridge in New York July 29, 2010 calling for a permanent repeal of Arizona's controversial immigration law, which takes effect today. AFP/ Getty Images / Timothy A. Clary



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Los Angeles workers from 32 different unions joined local faith and community leaders at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles on Thursday, July 29, 2010, boarding 11 buses bound for Arizona to protest Arizona immigration law SB 1070. AP / Adam Lau



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Maria Zamora, left, and a man who declined to be identified, rally with Los Angeles workers from 32 different unions who joined local faith and community leaders at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles to board 11 buses bound for Arizona to protest the state's immigration law SB 1070 on Thursday, July 29, 2010. AP / Adam Lau



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A street vendor lines up his goods along a street as cars line-up to cross to the U.S. near the port of entry in San Luis Rio Colorado, Mexico, on the other side of the border from the U.S. city of Yuma, Arizona, Thursday July 29, 2010. AP / Guillermo Arias



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Deportees pray as they gather for breakfast provided by the Kino Border Initiative in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, Thursday, July 29, 2010. Opponents of Arizona's immigration crackdown went ahead with protests Thursday despite a judge's ruling that delayed enforcement of most the law. AP / Jae C. Hong



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A woman, who declined to give her name, is hugged by her husband as they chat between the border fence separating Nogales, Ariz., and Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, Wednesday, July 28, 2010. AP / Jae C. Hong



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Nora Nendivin, right, cries as she is hugged by Marcela Saragoza, both of Phoenix, as they celebrate at the Arizona capitol Wednesday, July 28, 2010 in Phoenix, shortly after portions of Arizona's new immigration law, SB1070, were blocked by a federal judge. AP / Ross D. Franklin



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Dozens of U.S.-born children from across the country traveled to the White House with their undocumented parents to march and demonstrate against recent deportations July 28, 2010 in Washington, DC. Getty Images / Chip Somodevilla



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A protester sitting on Seventh Street is led away by police during an immigration reform protest outside a federal building in San Francisco, Wednesday, July 28, 2010. AP / Eric Risberg



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Women pray with dozens at an overnight vigil at the Arizona Capitol late Wednesday, July 28, 2010 in Phoenix, only hours after portions of Arizona's new immigration law, SB1070, was blocked by a federal judge. AP / Ross D. Franklin



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A group of illegal immigrants listen to a Border Patrol agent while being deported to Mexico at the Nogales Port of Entry in Nogales, Ariz., Wednesday, July 28, 2010. AP / Jae C. Hong



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Ernesto Fiscal, foreground, and other illegal immigrants who were deported to Mexico early Wednesday morning, gather near the Nogales Port of Entry in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, Wednesday, July 28, 2010. AP / Jae C. Hong



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Two men illegally cross the border fence separating Nogales, Ariz., and Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, Wednesday, July 28, 2010. AP / Jae C. Hong



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US Border Patrol agents Colleen Agle (L) and Richard Funke (R) patrol on the border between Arizona and Mexico at the town of Nogales on July 28, 2010. AFP/ Getty Images / Mark Ralston



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A recently-deported Mexican immigrant receives medical treatment from American volunteer Sarah Bruno at an aid station July 27, 2010 in Nogales, Mexico, just across the border from Arizona. Getty Images / John Moore



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Recently-deported Mexican immigrants receive free clothing at an aid station July 27, 2010 in Nogales, Mexico, just across the border from Arizona. Getty Images / John Moore



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Two woman walk along the U.S.-Mexico border showing graffiti that reads "the walls" in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, Tuesday, July 27, 2010. AP / Jae C. Hong



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A man talks on the phone as he stands next to the U.S.-Mexico border in Nogales, Ariz., Tuesday, July 27, 2010. AP / Jae C. Hong



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A Border Patrol agent checks the identification card of a bus driver at a checkpoint in Amado, Ariz., Tuesday, July 27, 2010. AP / Jae C. Hong



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A Guatemalan immigrant stands on a curbside awaiting day labor construction work on July 26, 2010 in Phoenix, Ariz. Getty Images / John Moore



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An immigrant stands on a curbside awaiting day labor work on July 26, 2010 in Phoenix, Ariz. Getty Images / John Moore



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A suspect, left, is fingerprinted by a Maricopa Country Sheriff's detention officer on Monday, July 26, 2010 to check his immigration status at a 287(g) processing station after being brought from the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office Fourth Avenue Jail in Phoenix. The federal government is rapidly expanding a program to identify illegal immigrants using fingerprints from arrests, drawing opposition from local authorities and advocates who argue the initiative amounts to an excessive dragnet. AP / Ross D. Franklin



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Activists hang banners from a freeway overpass protesting Arizona's anti-illegal immigration law during the rush hour commute in downtown Los Angeles on Monday July 26, 2010. AP / Nick Ut



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