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July 21, 2010
Trying to beat the heat
It's hot out there. Hotter than than ever, according to scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), this year has already seen global surface temperatures higher than any year on record. The combined global land and ocean average surface temperature for June 2010 was the warmest on record at 16.2°C (61.1°F), which is 0.68°C (1.22°F) above the 20th century average of 15.5°C (59.9°F). The previous record for June was set in 2005. June 2010 was the fourth consecutive warmest month on record (March, April, and May 2010 were also the warmest on record). (26 images)

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Belarus residents cool off in the waterjets of a waterfall in Minsk, Belarus, Thursday, July 15, 2010. A heat wave hit the city with temperatures going higher than 30C (86 F). AP / Sergei Grits


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Passers-by cool themselves with a fan sprinkling water vapor in central Budapest Wednesday, July 14, 2010, after the national chief medical officer decreed the highest heat alert in most of Hungary due to a heat wave hitting the country throughout the week. The temperature in Budapest on Wednesday peaked at around 34C (93.2F) and is expected to reach 37C (98.6F) on Thursday. AP / Zsolt Szigetvary



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Children jump from a tower into the Ammersee Lake in Utting , southern Germany, Monday, July 12, 2010. Temperatures rose to around 35 degrees Celsius (95 degrees Fahrenheit). AP / Matthias Schrader



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Polar bear Antonia swims in the 'Zoom Erlebniswelt' amusement park in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, Tuesday, July 20, 2010. AP / Clemens Bilan



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A tourist cools off his head into a fountain in Rome's People square, Friday, July 16, 2010, as temperatures were expected to reach 38 Celsius degrees (100.4 Fahrenheit) over the week-end in central and northern Italy. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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A street vendor uses his umbrella to shelter from the sun in front of Rome's Colosseum, Saturday, July 17, 2010, as temperatures are expected to reach 38 Celsius degrees (100.4 Fahrenheit degrees) over the week-end in central and northern Italy. AP / Pier Paolo Cito



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Two-year-old Yola, of Germany, walks with her Irish Wolfhound, Trorrent, in Bregenz, Austria, on Saturday, July 17, 2010. The weather forecast for the weekend was for thunderstorms with hail and strong rain throughout the country. (AP Photo/ Kerstin Joensson) AP / Kerstin Joensson



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A young woman bathes in the lake of Geneva, on one of the hottest days of this summer so far, in Lausanne, Switzerland, Sunday, July 11, 2010. AP / Dominic Favre



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A child cools off during a hot spell in central Europe by playing in a sprinkler in Warsaw, Poland, on Wednesday, July 14, 2010. AP / Czarek Sokolowski



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Boys ride bicycles at a fountain to try to cool themselves in the Ural Mountains city of Yekaterinburg, about 1500 kilometers (900 miles) east of Moscow, Russia, Thursday, July 15, 2010. A heat wave hit central Russsia and Ural, breaking temperature records going higher than 30 C (86 F). AP / Alexander Zemlianichenko



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Beachgoers cool off in the Mediterranean Sea on a packed beach in Alexandria, Egypt Tuesday, July 20, 2010. Egyptians from the capital Cairo and around the country head north to the coastal city of Alexandria in the summer months for vacation and to beat the stifling summer city heat. AP / Ben Curtis



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Children play with water in a fountain at a park in Tel Aviv, Israel, Thursday, July 15, 2010. Temperatures climbed up to 31 degrees Celsius (88 Fahrenheit) in Tel Aviv on Thursday. AP / Ariel Schalit



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Ali Ahmed , 8, swims with cattle in the Tigris river in Baghdad, Iraq, Wednesday, July 14, 2010. The animals are bathed daily to help keep them free of diseases and to protect them from the heat. AP / Hadi Mizban



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A boy plays a water gun in hot weather in Ocean Park, a tourist spot in Hong Kong Saturday, July 17, 2010. AP / Kin Cheung



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A boy tries to beat summer heat by splashing water at a Tokyo park Saturday, July 17, 2010. The Japan Meteorological Agency on Saturday said the temperature in central Tokyo shot up to 31 degrees Celsius (88 F) at noon. The weather forecasters said the rainy season seemed to be over in many parts of the nation, including the Tokyo area. AP / Koji Sasahara



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In this photo released by China's Xinhua news agency, participants wait for the beginning of drifting at a scenic spot in Jinhua, east China's Zhejiang province, on Sunday July 11, 2010. Tourists from Shanghai and Hangzhou gather here for drifting and cooling off as the weather became hot at the beginning of July, Xinhua said. AP / Ge Yuejin



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Elephant Chandra enjoys a cold shower at the zoo in Zurich, Switzerland, Wednesday, July 14, 2010. Temperatures are rising up to 35 degrees Celsius (95 degrees Fahrenheit) in all parts of Switzerland. AP / Steffen Schmitt



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People enjoy the sunny weather and the sea on the Samil beach in Vigo, on July 18, 2010. AFP/ Getty Images / Miguel Riopa



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A boy cools off in the Washington Square fountain, Saturday, July 17, 2010 in New York. AP / Mary Altaffer



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People walking on the Manhattan Bridge use umbrellas to shade themselves from the sun on a hot summer afternoon July 19, 2010 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. According to scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) this year has already seen global surface temperatures higher than any year on record, and a continuing hot summer is expected. Getty Images / Chris Hondros



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Road construction workers Damon Cooper, left, and Craig Skeeters, right, endure 90-degree temperatures while digging up pavement on Capitol Avenue in front of the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Ill., Friday, July 16, 2010. Temperatures in the high 90's are expected to continue through next week in the Midwest. AP / Seth Perlman



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Juwuan Patterson, front, and Sakinah Reed, cool off in the spray of an open hydrant at 87th Street and Burley Avenue in Chicago on Thursday, July 15, 2010. Chicago Tribune / Terrence Antonio James



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Dazjiah Ivy stands under a sprinkler in a water park to beat the early evening temperatures in Indianapolis, Friday, July 16, 2010. Temperatures are expected to be in the low 90's in central for the next few days. AP / Darron Cummings



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Two girls cool off at the Santa Monica Beach in Santa Monica, Calif., Wednesday, July 14, 2010. The first significant heat wave of the year is expected to intensify Wednesday in Los Angeles with temperatures climbing into the mid to upper 90s. AP / Jae C. Hong



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Lightning strikes the Antelope Valley near Pearblossom, Calif., Thursday, July 15, 2010. Southern California faces more ferocious heat coupled to the threat of thunderstorms and lightning strikes that could ignite more desert wildfires. AP / Mike Meadows



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