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August 24, 2010
Hurricane Katrina five years later
On Aug. 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast. As the five-year anniversary approaches, here's a look by Getty Images photographer Maria Tama at scenes from then and now. Following Tama's pictures are some of the powerful images of the disaster. (48 images)

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(Top Photo) Robert Fontaine looks on at the scene where he fled a burning house fire in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina August 23, 2010 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Fontaine said he stayed in the house to take care of dogs who were left behind. He was using candles due to a lack of electricity when one of the dogs knocked over a candle, causing the fire. Fontaine said, "My whole life, my whole world crashed. For everyone, not just for me." (Bottom Photo) Robert Fontaine walks past a burning house fire in the 7th ward September 6, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Getty Images / Mario Tama


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(Top Photo) The New Orleans Saints look on during a preseason game against the Houston Texans at the Superdome August 21, 2010 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Bottom Photo) Stranded victims of Hurricane Katrina rest inside the Superdome, which has become a makeshift shelter for hurricane vitcims, September 2, 2005 in New Orleans. Getty Images / Mario Tama



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(Top Photo) The Lower Ninth Ward is seen with homes newly constructed by the Make it Right Foundation August 24, 2010 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Bottom Photo) The devastated Lower Ninth Ward is seen with the city skyline in the background August 25, 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Getty Images / Mario Tama



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(Top Photo) The reconstructed levee wall is seen in the Lower Ninth Ward August 20, 2010 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Bottom Photo) Workers rebuild the levee, which was breached by Hurricane Katrina along the Industrial Canal in the Lower Ninth Ward April 25, 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Repair work on the New Orleans levees was scheduled to be finished in time for the start of hurricane season June 1. Getty Images / Mario Tama



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(Top Photo) Young residents play football near their home in a new development built by the Make it Right Foundation in the Lower Ninth Ward August 20, 2010 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The Make it Right Foundation is constructing homes for families who lost theirs in Hurricane Katrina's aftermath. (Bottom Photo) A group of Amish student volunteers tour the devastated Ninth Ward February 24, 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Getty Images / Mario Tama



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(Top Photo) Cars travel over a bridge crossing the Industrial Canal to the Lower Ninth Ward August 23, 2010 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Bottom Photo) Two men paddle in high water by the bridge crossing the Industrial Canal to the Lower Ninth Ward after Hurricane Katrina devastated the area August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Getty Images / Mario Tama



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(Top Photo) A statue of the Virgin Mary stands in an above-ground cemetery August 19, 2010 in Buras, Louisiana. (Bottom Photo) A statue of the Virgin Mary and an opened crypt are seen at an above-ground cemetery February 23, 2006 in Buras, Louisiana. The cemetery was flooded during Hurricane Katrina causing a number of coffins to float away from their crypts. Getty Images / Mario Tama



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(Top Photo) The cemetery outside Saint Patrick's Church in Plaquemines Parish is seen August 19, 2010 in Port Sulphur, Louisiana. (Bottom Photo) Water floods an above-ground cemetery outside Saint Patrick's Church in Plaquemines Parish September 11, 2005 in Port Sulphur, Louisiana. Getty Images / Mario Tama



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(Top Photo) A sign asking for information about still-unidentified coffins stands at an above-ground cemetery August 19, 2010 in Buras, Louisiana. (Bottom Photo) A sign asking for information about unidentified coffins stands at an above-ground cemetery February 23, 2006 in Buras, Louisiana. The cemetery was flooded during Hurricane Katrina, causing a number of coffins to float away from their crypts. Getty Images / Mario Tama



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(Left) Willi Lee, 84, stands inside his home that was damaged by Hurricane Katrina, and which he wants to rebuild August 18, 2010 in Pearlington, Mississippi. Lee says he has received the funds to rebuild but cannot find a trustworthy builder. (Right) Willi Lee, 79, stands inside his home that was damaged by Hurricane Katrina, and which he wants to rebuild May 25, 2006 in Pearlington, Mississippi. Lee said he attempted to ride out the storm in the house but eventually was washed outside by the flooding where he was able to cling to a tree limb for hours until the floodwater subsided. Lee says a poisonous water moccasin snake clung to the limb next to him the entire time. The eye of Hurricane Katrina passed directly over Pearlington, located approximately midway between New Orleans and Biloxi, Mississippi. Getty Images / Mario Tama



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Waves crash against a boat washed onto Highway 80 as Hurricane Katrina hits the Gulf Coast Monday, Aug. 29, 2005 in Gulfport, Miss. AP / John Bazemore



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Bay St. Louis Emergency Management Agency volunteer crews rescue the Taylor family from the roof of their suburban, which became trapped on US 90 due to flooding during Hurricane Katrina, in this Aug. 29, 2005, photo in Bay St. Louis, Miss. AP / Ben Sklar



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Hurricane Katrina refugees cross a bridge on US 90 in a downpour September 1, 2005, as they walk out of New Orleans. August 29, 2010 the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which devastated the city and much of the US Gulf Coast. Katrina unleashed torrential rains, leading to disastrous flooding that left about 1,600 people dead, destroyed thousands of homes and marred the presidency of Obama's predecessor George W. Bush, whose administration was severely criticized for its handling of the crisis. AFP/ Getty Images / Robert Sullivan



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The city of New Orleans pictured at dawn, Saturday, Sept. 3, 2005 as fires continue to burn and water still stands in many areas of the city. New York Times / Vincent Laforet



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Water spills over a levee along the Inner Harbor Navigational Canal in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 30 August, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. New York Times / Vincent Laforet



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Water surrounds homes just east of downtown New Orleans, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2005, the day after Hurricane Katrina made landfall. The Dallas Morning News / Smiley N. Pool



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Flood waters from Hurricane Katrina cover streets 30 August, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. New York Times / Vincent Laforet



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Floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina cover a portion of New Orleans, La., Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2005, a day after Katrina passed through the city. AP / David J. Phillip



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A flooded cemetery from Hurricane Katrina is seen from a view aboard a U.S. Army Chinook helicopter with Bravo Company 2-4 Aviation, 4th Infantry Division out of Fort Hood, Texas, in this Sept. 3, 2005, file photo in New Orleans. AP / Haraz N. Ghanbari



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A tattered American flag flies in front of the blown out Hyatt Hotel in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina devastated the area on Monday, Aug. 29, 2005. AP / Bill Haber



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Thousands of people displaced by Hurricane Katrina await buses to depart the Superdome September 2, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. AFP/ Getty Images / Pool



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This September 3, 2005 file photo shows people waiting to be evacuated from the Superdome take cover after the National Guard reported shots being fired outside the arena, six days after hurricane Katrina hit the city. AFP/ Getty Images / Nicholas Kamm



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Evelyn Turner cries alongside the body of her common-law husband, Xavier Bowie, after he died in New Orleans, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2005. Bowie and Turner had decided to ride out Hurricane Katrina when they could not find a way to leave the city. Bowie, who had lung cancer, died when he ran out of oxygen Tuesday afternoon. AP / Eric Gay



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Clorestine Haney and her 6-year-old daughter cried -- after the rotor wash from landing helicopters sandblasted her daughter -- as they received their daily meal from the National Guard at the Convention Center in Downtown New Orleans on the sixth day following Hurricane Katrina. New York Times / Vincent Laforet



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The body of a victim of Hurricane Katrina floats in floodwaters in New Orleans September 1, 2005. AFP/ Getty Images / James Nielsen



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A man signals from a rooftop as he awaits rescue from the flooding caused by Hurricane Katrina, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2005, in New Orleans. The Dallas Morning News / Smiley N. Pool



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Residents wait on top of a building to be evacuated from the flood waters of New Orleans, as officials evacuate the city Wednesday afternoon, Aug. 31, 2005 after Hurricane Katrina made landfall. The Dallas Morning News / Smiley N. Pool



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New Orleans residents wait to be rescued from the floodwaters of Hurricane Katrina Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2005 in New Orleans. AP / David J. Phillip



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Residents wait on a rooftop to be rescued from the floodwaters of Hurricane Katrina, in this Sept. 1, 2005, file photo, in New Orleans. AP / David J. Phillip



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Ronald Wood is rescued from his home in New Orleans, Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina made landfall near New Orleans, Louisiana on Monday 29 August 2005. AFP/ Getty Images / James Nielsen



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A victim of Hurricane Katrina is evacuated by helicopter over the devastation caused by the high winds and heavy flooding in the greater New Orleans area, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2005. New York Times / Vincent Laforet



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New Orleans residents are rescued by helicopter from the floodwaters of Hurricane Katrina Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2005 in New Orleans. AP / David J. Phillip



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Adrienne Fournet, 17, center, brings water to Elise Eller, at a Hurricane Katrina evacuation center at St. Thomas More gymnasium in Baton Rouge, La., Monday, Aug. 29, 2005. Eller was among more than 150 residents of Wynhoven Health Care Center in Marrero, La., who were evacuated to the center. THE (BATON ROUGE) ADVOCATE / Kerry Maloney



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Robin Whittington is reunited with her husband at the airport in New Orleans, Friday, Sept. 2, 2005. Whittingtons were flown in on separate helicopters after being evacuated from New Orleans. New York Times / Vincent Laforet



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Tam Cu, from left, Jason Jackson and Linda Bryant look over the damage to Bryant's home from Hurricane Katrina in Biloxi, Mississippi, on Wednesday, August 31, 2005. Dallas Morning News / Barbara Davidson



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A scene of destruction is all that remains, September 22, 2005 in Lakeview District, the devastated upper middle class neighborhood directly behind the breach of the east side of 17th Street Canal in New Orleans. AFP/ Getty Images / Robyn Beck



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