A photo blog of world events by Sacbee.com Assistant Director of Multimedia Tim Reese.
Subscribe to feed Subscribe to this blog's feed
August 6, 2010
Russian Wildfires Continue to Burn
MOSCOW (AP) -- A choking smog from raging wildfires shrouded Moscow on Friday, grounding flights, plunging the city's iconic Red Square into a sea of dirty mist and stinging eyes and throats across the Russian capital. Flocks of tourists had to don face masks just to tread the square's historic cobblestones, straining to photograph the Kremlin's barely visible spires and the hazy domes of St. Basil's Cathedrals. Dozens of flights were grounded and others were diverted away from the capital's Domodedovo and Vnukovo airports, as smog brought runway visibility down to 220 yards (200 meters), officials said.
More than 500 separate blazes were burning nationwide Friday, mainly across western Russia, amid the country's most intense heat wave in 130 years. At least 52 people have died and 2,000 homes have been destroyed in the blazes. Russian officials have admitted that the 10,000 firefighters battling the blazes aren't enough -- an assessment echoed by many villagers, who said the fires swept through their hamlets in minutes. (26 images)

Follow The Frame on Twitter at sacbee_theframe

Tourists wear protective face masks as they walk along the Red square in thick smog, with Saint Basil's Cathedral partially visible in the back, in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Aug. 6, 2010. The city of Moscow was shrouded Friday by a dense smog that grounded flights at international airports and seeped into homes and offices, as wildfires that have killed at least 52 people nationwide continued to burn. AP / Mikhail Metzel


russia_fires_0806_02.jpg
A young couple wearing masks to protect from the thickest blanket of smog covering walk through the Red Square as the heavy smog covered Moscow, Russia, early Friday, Aug. 6, 2010, with the Historical Museum at the background. Temperatures up to 100 F (38 C) have exacerbated forest and peat bog fires across Russia's central and western regions, destroying close to 2,000 homes. AP / Alexander Zemlianichenko



russia_fires_0806_03.jpg
Tourists wear protective face masks as they walk along the Red square amid a thick smog, Moscow, Russia, Friday, Aug. 6, 2010. AP / Misha Japaridze



russia_fires_0806_04.jpg
Tourists wear protective face masks as they walk along the Red square amid a thick smog, Moscow, Russia, Friday, Aug. 6, 2010. AP / Misha Japaridze



russia_fires_0806_05.jpg
A Kremlin honor guard is seen at Alexander's Garden outside the Kremlin, through a heavy smog covering Moscow, Russia, Friday, Aug. 6, 2010. AP / Misha Japaridze



russia_fires_0806_06.jpg
St. Basil's Cathedral, left, and the Kremlin, right, are seen as tourists walk through thick smog on the Red Square in Moscow, Russia, Friday, Aug. 6, 2010. AP / Mikhail Metzel



russia_fires_0806_07.jpg
A Russian man tries the door on the charred carcass of a building some 450km south of Moscow in Izlegoshche on August 6, 2010. The village of Izlegoshche was completely destroyed by Russia's worst ever wildfires and will not be rebuilt according to an administrative decision. AFP/ Getty Images / Alexey Sazonov



russia_fires_0806_08.jpg
Russian women look inside the charred carcass of a building 450km south of Moscow in Izlegoshche on August 6, 2010. AFP/ Getty Images / Alexey Sazonov



russia_fires_0806_09.jpg
Russian woman Olga Ivanova cleans up debris from the charred remains of burnt out homes in the village of Peredeltsy on August 5, 2010. AFP/ Getty Images / Artyom Korotayev



russia_fires_0806_10.jpg
In this Thursday evening, Aug. 5, 2010 photo, Russian women wearing masks to protect them from the thickest blanket of smog, sit in their dacha (summer cottage) as forest fire came very close to the village of Murmino in Ryazan region, some 180 km (111 miles) southeast of Moscow. AP / STR



russia_fires_0806_11.jpg
In this Thursday evening, Aug. 5, 2010 photo, Russian fire fighter takes a short break as forest fire came very close to the village of Murmino in Ryazan region, some 180 km (111 miles) southeast of Moscow. AP / STR



russia_fires_0806_12.jpg
A Russian tries to stop fire near the village of Murmino on August 5, 2010. Russia struggled to contain the worst wildfires in its modern history. AFP/ Getty Images / Artyom Korotayev



russia_fires_0806_13.jpg
A Russian tries to stop fire near the village of Golovanovo, Ryazan region, on August 5, 2010. AFP/ Getty Images / Natalia Kolesnikova



russia_fires_0806_14.jpg
A Russian tries to stop fire near the village Golovanovo, Ryazan region, on August 5, 2010. AFP/ Getty Images / Natalia Kolesnikova



russia_fires_0806_15.jpg
Alexander Babayev, center, one of volunteers enlisted through a social network to help Russian firefighters extinguish a forest fire near the village of Plotava, 80 km (49 miles) east of Moscow, Thursday, Aug. 5, 2010. AP / Sergey Ponomarev



russia_fires_0806_16.jpg
A Russian Emergency Ministry Mi-26 helicopter lifts a bucket of water to spew onto a burning forest near the village of Plotava, 80 km (49 miles) east of Moscow, Thursday, Aug. 5, 2010. AP / Sergey Ponomarev



russia_fires_0806_17.jpg
A Russian tries to stop fire near the village Golovanovo, Ryazan region, on August 5, 2010. AFP/ Getty Images / Natalia Kolesnikova



russia_fires_0806_18.jpg
Sergei Semanov, 53, together with his neighbors try to extinguish a forest fire which came very close to their dachas (summer cottages) in the village of Murmino in Ryazan region, some 180 km (111 miles) southeast of Moscow,Thursday, Aug. 5, 2010. AP / STR



russia_fires_0806_19.jpg
A fire fighter attempts to extinguish a forest fire near the village of Dolginino in the Ryazan region, some 180 km (111 miles) southeast of Moscow, Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2010. AP / STR



russia_fires_0806_20.jpg
A fire fighter attempts to extinguish a forest fire near the village of Dolginino in the Ryazan region, some 180 km (111 miles) southeast of Moscow, Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2010. AP / STR



russia_fires_0806_21.jpg
A Russian man tries to stop fire near village Dolginino on August 4, 2010. AFP/ Getty Images / Artyom Korotayev



russia_fires_0806_22.jpg
A man tries to make a barrier infront of a forest in fire near village Dolginino on August 4, 2010. AFP/ Getty Images / Artyom Korotayev



russia_fires_0806_23.jpg
A man stops while riding a bike in the thick smoke in the village of Keltsy in Ryazan region, some 180 km (111 miles) southeast of Moscow, Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2010. AP / Misha Japaridze



russia_fires_0806_24.jpg
A Russian Emergency Ministry helicopter spews sea water onto a burning land-fill area in the village of Loo near the Black Sea resort of Sochi, Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2010. AP / Igor Yakunin



russia_fires_0806_25.jpg
This August 5, 2010 NASA satellite image shows smoke from wildfires burning in Russia. Russia waged a losing battle to contain the worst wildfires in its modern history that have killed 50, as Prime Minister Vladimir Putin banned grain exports due to the drought. New fires were appearing faster than the emergency services could put out the old ones as the total affected area nationwide increased by around 7,000 hectares to 196,000 hectares (482,000 acres), the emergencies ministry said. AFP/ Getty Images / NASA



About Comments

Reader comments on Sacbee.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Sacramento Bee. If you see an objectionable comment, click the "report abuse" button below it. We will delete comments containing inappropriate links, obscenities, hate speech, and personal attacks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. See more about comments here.

What You Should Know About Comments on Sacbee.com

Sacbee.com is happy to provide a forum for reader interaction, discussion, feedback and reaction to our stories. However, we reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments or ban users who can't play nice. (See our full terms of service here.)

Here are some rules of the road:

• Keep your comments civil. Don't insult one another or the subjects of our articles. If you think a comment violates our guidelines click the "report abuse" button to notify the moderators. Responding to the comment will only encourage bad behavior.

• Don't use profanities, vulgarities or hate speech. This is a general interest news site. Sometimes, there are children present. Don't say anything in a way you wouldn't want your own child to hear.

• Do not attack other users; focus your comments on issues, not individuals.

• Stay on topic. Only post comments relevant to the article at hand. If you want to discuss an issue with a specific user, click on his profile name and send him a direct message.

• Do not copy and paste outside material into the comment box.

• Don't repeat the same comment over and over. We heard you the first time.

• Do not use the commenting system for advertising. That's spam and it isn't allowed.

• Don't use all capital letters. That's akin to yelling and not appreciated by the audience.

You should also know that The Sacramento Bee does not screen comments before they are posted. You are more likely to see inappropriate comments before our staff does, so we ask that you click the "report abuse" button to submit those comments for moderator review. You also may notify us via email at feedback@sacbee.com. Note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us the profile name of the user who made the comment. Remember, comment moderation is subjective. You may find some material objectionable that we won't and vice versa.

If you submit a comment, the user name of your account will appear along with it. Users cannot remove their own comments once they have submitted them, but you may ask our staff to retract one of your comments by sending an email to feedback@sacbee.com. Again, make sure you note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us your profile name.

hide comments

On October 14, The Sacramento Bee will temporarily remove commenting from sacbee.com. While we design the upgrade, we encourage you to tell us what you like and don't like about commenting on sacbee.com and other websites. We've heard from hundreds of you already and we're listening. Please continue to add your thoughts and questions here. We also encourage you to write Letters to the Editor on this and other topics.