A photo blog of world events by Sacbee.com Assistant Director of Multimedia Tim Reese.
Subscribe to feed Subscribe to this blog's feed
September 3, 2010
Weakening Hurricane Earl steams north
CHATHAM, Mass. (AP) -- A weakening but still dangerous Hurricane Earl steamed toward the gray-shingled cottages and fishing villages of Cape Cod on Friday, disrupting people's vacations on the unofficial final weekend of the short New England summer. Packing winds of just 80 mph, the storm swirled up the Eastern Seaboard after sideswiping North Carolina's Outer Banks, where it caused flooding but no injuries and little damage. For the most part, it was expected to swing wide of New York City and Long Island, and much of the rest of the mid-Atlantic region, but pass close by Cape Cod, Nantucket Island and Martha's Vineyard late Friday night, bringing rain and high winds. (28 images)

Follow The Frame on Twitter at sacbee_theframe

Kellie Maier gets splashed by a passing car while kayaking on water covered Highway 12, on September 3, 2010 in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. Getty Images / Mark Wilson


earl_02.jpg
A women gets surprised by incoming surf while standing on a jetty, on September 3, 2010 in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. Hurricane Earl caused heavy surf as it passed the Outer Banks early Friday morning causing minimal damage. Getty Images / Mark Wilson



earl_03.jpg
Scott Kerns kayaks down flooded Hwy 12 in Frisco, NC on Friday, Sept. 3, 2010. Sound side flooding from Hurricane Earl flooded much of the Outer Banks in the early morning hours. AP / Steve Earley



earl_04.jpg
Kim Harper drags a workbench back to her home across flooded Hwy 12 in Frisco, N.C. Friday, Sept. 3, 2010 after sound side flood waters from Hurricane Earl carried it away overnight. AP / Steve Early



earl_05.jpg
Sea levels remain high throughout the morning Friday , Sept, 3, 2010 as Hurricane Earl lingers offshore of Nags Head, N.C. AP / Stephen M. Katz



earl_06.jpg
People stand on the Avalon Fishing Pier watching heavy surf caused by hurricane Earl, on September 3, 2010 in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. Getty Images / Mark Wilson



earl_07.jpg
A man walks into one of the few convenience stores that remain open, on September 3, 2010 in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. Getty Images / Mark Wilson



earl_08.jpg
Cars travel down a water covered beach road, on September 3, 2010 in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. Getty Images / Mark Wilson



earl_09.jpg
Debris covers the road along the beach in south Nags Head, N.C., Friday, Sept. 3, 2010 after wind and rain from Hurricane Earl passed through overnight. AP / Gerry Broome



earl_10.jpg
Utilities workers try to support power lines that were blown sideways from winds produced by Hurricane Earl in Nags Head, N.C., Friday, Sept. 3, 2010. AP / Gerry Broome



earl_11.jpg
A sign that was advertising "I Survived Earl T Shirts" lies broken in front of a T shirt shop after Hurricane Earl on September 3, 2010 in Nags Head, North Carolina. Getty Images / Mark Wilson



earl_12.jpg
Electric utility crews repair several toppled power lines in Nags Head in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, September 3, 2010 after Hurricane Earl blew through. AFP/ Getty Images / Paul J. Richards



earl_13.jpg
A sign and overhang at a Shell gas station lies on the ground after the high winds of Hurricane Earl, on September 3, 2010 in Nags Head, North Carolina. Getty Images / Mark Wilson



earl_14.jpg
Flood waters surround a home as Hurricane Earl swept through the area, in Avon, N.C., Friday, Sept. 3, 2010. AP / Mike Baker



earl_15.jpg
R.V. Hodge removes sandbags from a storefront in Beaufort, N.C., as residents return to business as usual after Hurricane Earl brushed past the North Carolina coast Friday, Sept. 3, 2010. AP / Chuck Burton



earl_16.jpg
It's back to business as usual as Kurt Jones sets out beach umbrellas at the Sheraton Hotel on Atlantic Beach, North Carolina, Friday, September 3, 2010. People on the Crystal Coast were relieved by the near miss of Hurricane Earl. MCT / Chris Seward



earl_17.jpg
Two men put a large fish back onto the front of a resturant after Hurricane Earl on September 3, 2010 in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. Getty Images / Mark Wilson



earl_18.jpg
People watch the rough ocean in the fog on September 3, 2010 in Montauk, New York. Getty Images / Spencer Platt



earl_19.jpg
Ryan MacLeish, a lifeguard with the Rehoboth Beach Patrol, body surfs in waves as Hurricane Earl passes offshore of Rehoboth Beach, Del., on Friday, Sept. 3, 2010. AP / Jacquelyn Martin



earl_20.jpg
People walk along the boardwalk as as Hurricane Earl moved up the eastern coast, Friday, Sept. 3, 2010, in Ocean City, Md. AP / Rob Carr



earl_21.jpg
People watch the rough surf off the Montauk lighthouse on September 3, 2010 in Montauk, New York. Getty Images / Spencer Platt



earl_22.jpg
Holly Corbett, of Newark, Del., hugs Merton Briggs, of Angola Beach, Del., as weather from Hurricane Earl begins to move into Rehoboth Beach, Del. on Friday, Sept. 3, 2010. AP / Jacquelyn Martin



earl_23.jpg
People walk along a section of beach closed to swimmers due to rough surf from Hurricane Earl on September 3, 2010 in Montauk, New York. Getty Images / Spencer Platt



earl_24.jpg
A window of a grocery is tapped up in preparation for Hurricane Earl on September 3, 2010 in Montauk, New York. Getty Images / Spencer Platt



earl_25.jpg
A business is boarded up in preparation for Hurricane Earl on Main Street September 3, 2010 in Chatham, Massachusetts. Getty Images / Darren McCollester



earl_26.jpg
Norm Frazee, left, and Bob Steber, employees with Nantucket Island Resorts Retail, board up the Cavalier Gallery on Main Street on Thursday, Sept. 2, 2010 before Hurricane Earl arrives on the island in Nantucket, Mass. AP / Matthew J. Lee



earl_27.jpg
Jim and Melissa Feck, of Altamount, N.Y., pack their sleeping bags at Blackwoods Campground at Acadia National Park in advance of Hurricane Earl, Friday, Sept. 3, 2010, near Bar Harbor, Maine. The park closed the campground as a precaution. The Fecks found an ocean-front room at a nearby hotel where they plan to watch the storm. AP / Robert F. Bukaty



earl_28.jpg
The Gallishaw family from Seekonk, Mass., braces for a large wave as it crashes over the Goosebury Island causeway in Westport, Mass., as Hurricane Earl approaches Friday, Sept. 3, 2010. AP / Peter Pereira



About Comments

Reader comments on Sacbee.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Sacramento Bee. If you see an objectionable comment, click the "report abuse" button below it. We will delete comments containing inappropriate links, obscenities, hate speech, and personal attacks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. See more about comments here.

What You Should Know About Comments on Sacbee.com

Sacbee.com is happy to provide a forum for reader interaction, discussion, feedback and reaction to our stories. However, we reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments or ban users who can't play nice. (See our full terms of service here.)

Here are some rules of the road:

• Keep your comments civil. Don't insult one another or the subjects of our articles. If you think a comment violates our guidelines click the "report abuse" button to notify the moderators. Responding to the comment will only encourage bad behavior.

• Don't use profanities, vulgarities or hate speech. This is a general interest news site. Sometimes, there are children present. Don't say anything in a way you wouldn't want your own child to hear.

• Do not attack other users; focus your comments on issues, not individuals.

• Stay on topic. Only post comments relevant to the article at hand. If you want to discuss an issue with a specific user, click on his profile name and send him a direct message.

• Do not copy and paste outside material into the comment box.

• Don't repeat the same comment over and over. We heard you the first time.

• Do not use the commenting system for advertising. That's spam and it isn't allowed.

• Don't use all capital letters. That's akin to yelling and not appreciated by the audience.

You should also know that The Sacramento Bee does not screen comments before they are posted. You are more likely to see inappropriate comments before our staff does, so we ask that you click the "report abuse" button to submit those comments for moderator review. You also may notify us via email at feedback@sacbee.com. Note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us the profile name of the user who made the comment. Remember, comment moderation is subjective. You may find some material objectionable that we won't and vice versa.

If you submit a comment, the user name of your account will appear along with it. Users cannot remove their own comments once they have submitted them, but you may ask our staff to retract one of your comments by sending an email to feedback@sacbee.com. Again, make sure you note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us your profile name.

hide comments

On October 14, The Sacramento Bee will temporarily remove commenting from sacbee.com. While we design the upgrade, we encourage you to tell us what you like and don't like about commenting on sacbee.com and other websites. We've heard from hundreds of you already and we're listening. Please continue to add your thoughts and questions here. We also encourage you to write Letters to the Editor on this and other topics.