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January 10, 2011
Moment of silence for Arizona shooting victims
WASHINGTON (AP) -- A somber President Barack Obama led a moment of silence on Monday for a nation stunned by an attempted assassination against an Arizona congresswoman that left her gravely wounded, several others injured and six people dead. On a frigid Washington morning, the president and first lady Michelle Obama walked out of the White House to the sounding of a bell at 11 a.m. EST. Wearing overcoats, they stood next to each other on the South Lawn, each with their hands clasped, heads bowed and eyes closed. After a minute of silence, they walked inside, the president's hand on the first lady's back. The moment also was marked on the steps of the U.S. Capitol and around the nation at the direction of the president, who called for the country to come together in prayer or reflection for those killed and those fighting to recover. (26 images)

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President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama are joined by government employees on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Monday, Jan. 10, 2011, to observe a moment of silence for Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., and the other victims of an assassination attempt against her. AP / J. Scott Applewhite


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From left, Ellie Steve, 6, Lucia Reeves, 6, and Zoe Reeves, 18, gather for a candlelight vigil outside the offices U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., in Tucson, Ariz., Sunday, Jan. 9, 2011. Giffords was critically wounded during a shooting at a political event Saturday in Tucson. AP / Chris Carlson



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Megan Lopez, left, and Judith Mindlin gather for a candle light vigil outside the offices U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., in Tucson, Ariz., Sunday, Jan. 9, 2011. AP / Chris Carlson



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Well-wishers gather for a candlelight vigil outside the offices U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., in Tucson, Ariz., Sunday, Jan. 9, 2011. AP / Chris Carlson



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A boy places candle at a makeshift shrine at the University Medical Center, for those killed and wounded during an attack on U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-AZ) on January 9, 2011 in Tucson, Arizona. Getty Images / John Moore



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Photographs of Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, (D-Ariz.) and slain U.S. District Judge John M. Roll were displayed at a memorial in front of the University Medial Center in Tucson, Arizona, Sunday, January 9, 2011. MCT / Gina Ferazzi



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A memorial is set outside of the District Office of U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Gifford's (D-AZ) a day after a gunman allegedly opened fire on a group of people on January 9, 2011 in Tucson, Arizona. Getty Images / Kevin C. Cox



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A young girl places a rock on a sign at the makeshift memorial outside of the District Office of U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-AZ) a day after a gunman allegedly opened fire during a public event entitled 'Congress on your Corner' at the Safeway store on West Ina and North Oracle roads on January 9, 2011 in Tucson, Arizona. Getty Images / Kevin C. Cox



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Rachel Cooper-Blackmore, 9, adds a note to a make-shift memorial at Mesa Verde Elementary School in Tucson, Ariz., Monday, Jan. 10, 2011. AP / Chris Carlson



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A parent and a student leave a note at a make-shift memorial at Mesa Verde Elementary School in Tucson, Ariz., Monday, Jan. 10, 2011. AP / Chris Carlson



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Amanda Stinnett, a parent, looks over a make-shift memorial at Mesa Verde Elementary School in Tucson, Ariz., Monday, Jan. 10, 2011. AP / Chris Carlson



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Students look over a make-shift memorial at Mesa Verde Elementary School in Tucson, Ariz., Monday, Jan. 10, 2011. AP / Chris Carlson



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State Rep. Greg Morris observes a moment of silence with his son Jonathan, 8, for the shooting that injured U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Gifford, D-Ariz., at the beginning of the new session of the Georgia House of Representatives Monday, Jan. 10, 2011 in Atlanta. AP / David Goldman



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Madeline Marquez, from left, and Lindsey Baker join a group gathered on the U.S. Capitol grounds in Washington Sunday, Jan. 9, 2011, for a vigil in support of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., and the victims of Saturday's shooting in Arizona. AP / Manuel Balce Ceneta



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American flags fly at half staff on the National Mall in front of the U.S. Capitol in memory of the victims of Saturday's mass shooting in Tucson, Arizona January 10, 2011 in Washington, DC. U.S. President Barack Obama called on the nation to observe a moment of silence today at 11:00am in honor of those killed and wounded during a shooting rampage in Tucson, Arizona, where six people were killed and at least 13 others including Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-AZ) were wounded. Getty Images / Win McNamee



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From the left, U.S. Capitol guide Michael Judge, Theresa Nazario, Terri Womack, wife of U.S. Rep. Womack, U.S. Rep. Steve Womack (D-AR) and Capitol guide Ara Carbonneau observe a moment of silence at 11:00 a.m. in the Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol in memory of the victims of this past weekend's mass shooting in Arizona. Getty Images / Win McNamee



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Tour groups observe a moment of silence in the Rotunda of the US Capitol in Washington on January 10, 2011 for Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., and other shooting victims, Monday, Jan. 10, 2011, on the East Steps of the Capitol on Capitol Hill in Washington. AFP/ Getty Images / Tim Sloan



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A television monitor shows President Barack Obama and Michele Obama as he presides over a national moment of silence, while specialists on the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange observe the occasion for severely injured Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and the people who were killed during an assassination attempt against her. AP / Richard Drew



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Congressional staffers bow their heads as they observe a moment of silence in honor of the six people killed and injured in the shooting in Tucson, Arizona. AFP/ Getty Images / Saul Loeb



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A crowd including members of Congress and their staff gather on the East Steps of the House of Representatives for a national moment of silence in honor of the victims of Saturday's mass shooting in Tucson, Arizona. Getty Images / Chip Somodevilla



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Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-MO) (C) embraces Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) after a moment of silence on Monday on the East Steps of the House of Representatives in honor of the victims of Saturday's mass shooting in Tucson, Arizona. Getty Images / Chip Somodevilla



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A crowd including members of Congress and their staff observe a moment of silence for Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., and other shooting victims, Monday, Jan. 10, 2011, on the East Steps of the Capitol on Capitol Hill in Washington. Getty Images / Chip Somodevilla



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Members of Congress and staff members observe a moment of silence for Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., and other shooting victims, Monday, Jan. 10, 2011, on the East Steps of the Capitol on Capitol Hill in Washington. AP / Charles Dharapak



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Congressional staffers bow their heads as they observe a moment of silence for Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., and other shooting victims, Monday, Jan. 10, 2011, on the East Steps of the Capitol on Capitol Hill in Washington. AFP/ Getty Images / Saul Loeb



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A Capitol Police officer stands watch on the East Front of the Capitol in Washington, Monday, Jan. 10, 2011, as flowers of condolence are left on the steps. AP / Charles Dharapak



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President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama return to the White House in Washington, Monday, Jan. 10, 2011, after observing a moment of silence for Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., and the other victims of an assassination attempt against her. AP / J. Scott Applewhite



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