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March 11, 2011
Hundreds killed in tsunami after 8.9 Japan quake
TOKYO (AP) -- A ferocious tsunami spawned by one of the largest earthquakes on record slammed Japan's eastern coast Friday, killing hundreds of people as it swept away ships, cars and homes while widespread fires burned out of control. Police said 200 to 300 bodies were found in the northeastern coastal city of Sendai, the city in Miyagi prefecture, or state, closest to the epicenter. Another 137 were confirmed killed, with 531 people missing. Police also said 627 people were injured. The magnitude-8.9 offshore quake unleashed a 23-foot (seven-meter) tsunami and was followed for hours by more than 50 aftershocks, many of them of more than magnitude 6.0.(34 images)
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Houses are shown in flames while the Natori river floods over the surrounding area with tsunami tidal waves in Natori city, Miyagi Prefecture, northern Japan, March 11, 2011, after strong earthquakes hit the area. AP / Yasushi Kanno

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Houses swallowed by tsunami waves burn in Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture (state) after Japan was struck by a strong earthquake off its northeastern coast Friday, March 11, 2011. AP / Kyodo News



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This aerial shot shows houses in flames after being hit by a tsunami at Natori city in Miyagi prefecture, northern Japan on March 11, 2011. AFP/ Getty Images /



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Giant fireballs rise from a burning oil refinery in Ichihara, Chiba Prefecture (state) after Japan was struck by a strong earthquake off its northeastern coast Friday, March 11, 2011. AP / Kyodo News



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Houses and others burn in Natori, Miyagi Prefecture (state) Friday night, March 11, 2011 after Japan was struck by a strong earthquake off its northeastern coast earlier in the day. AP / Kyodo News



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A building is in flames near Sendai airport, Miyagi prefecture (state), Japan, after a powerful earthquake, the largest in Japan's recorded history, slammed the eastern coasts Friday, March 11, 2011. AP / Kyodo News



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Smoke billows from houses in Natori, northern Japan, after the area was hit by a powerful earthquake and a tsunami on Friday March 11, 2011. The ferocious tsunami spawned by one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded slammed Japan's eastern coast Friday. AP / Taichi Kaizuka



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Houses, cars and other debris are washed away by tsunami tidal waves in Kesennuma in Miyagi Prefecture, northern Japan, after strong earthquakes hit the area Friday, March 11, 2011. AP / Keichi Nakane



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Cars and other Debris swept away by tsunami tidal waves are seen in Kesennuma in Miyagi Prefecture, northern Japan, after strong earthquakes hit the area Friday, March 11, 2011. AP / Keichi Nakane



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Flames rise from houses and debris half submerged in tsunami in Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture (state) after Japan was struck by a strong earthquake off its northeastern coast Friday, March 11, 2011. AP / Kyodo News



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Shores are submerged in Natori city, Miyagi prefecture (state), Japan, after a ferocious tsunami spawned by one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded, slammed Japan's eastern coasts Friday, March 11, 2011. AP / Kyodo News



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Light planes and vehicles sit among the debris after they were swept by a tsumani that struck Sendai airport in northern Japan on Friday March 11, 2011. AP / Kyodo News



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Earthquake-triggered tsumanis sweep shores along Iwanuma in northern Japan on Friday March 11, 2011. AP / Kyodo News



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Earthquake-triggered tsumanis sweep shores along Iwanuma in northern Japan on Friday March 11, 2011. AP / Kyodo News



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Waves of tsunami hit residences after a powerful earthquake in Natori, Miyagi prefecture (state), Japan, Friday, March 11, 2011. AP / Kyodo News



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Fishing boats and vehicles are carried by a tsunami wave at Onahama port in Iwaki city, in Fukushima prefecture, northern Japan on March 11, 2011. AFP/ Getty Images / Fukushima Minpo



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A tsunami tidal wave washes away houses in Kesennuma, Miyagi Prefecture, Friday, March 11, 2011 after strong earthquakes hit the area. AP / Keichi Nakane



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A tsunami, tidal wave smashes vehicles and houses at Kesennuma city in Miyagi prefecture, northern Japan on March 11, 2011. AFP/ Getty Images /



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A tsumani triggered by a powerful earthquake makes its way to sweep part of Sendai airport in northern Japan on Friday March 11, 2011. AP / Kyodo News



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Tarmac, parking lot and surrounding area are covered with mud and debris carried by tsunami at Sendai Airport in Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture (state) after Japan was struck by a strong earthquake off its northeastern coast Friday, March 11, 2011. AP / Kyodo News



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Sendai Airport is surrounded by waters in Miyagi prefecture (state), Japan, after a ferocious tsunami spawned by one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded slammed Japan's eastern coast Friday, March 11, 2011. AP / Kyodo News



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The tarmac and surrounding area of Sendai Airport is covered with water after a tsunami at in Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture Japan on Friday, March 11, 2011. AP / Kyodo News



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Vehicles remain overturned at Oarai town, Ibaraki prefecture (state), Japan, after a ferocious tsunami spawned by one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded, slammed Japan's eastern coasts Friday, March 11, 2011. AP / Kyodo News



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An aerial shot shows vehicles ready for shipping being carried by a tsunami tidal wave at Hitachinaka city in Ibaraki prefecture on March 11, 2011. AFP/ Getty Images /



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People gather outside Sendai station after a powerful earthquake hit northern Japan on Friday March 11, 2011. AP / Kyodo News



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An aerial view shows debris that remained on the ground after a tsunami wave to have hit Hitachinaka city in Ibaraki prefecture on March 11, 2011. AFP/ Getty Images /



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Workers inspect a caved-in section of a prefectural road in Satte, Saitama Prefecture, after one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded in Japan slammed its eastern coast Friday, March 11, 2011. AP / Kyodo News



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Residents check the damaged done on a road a house in Sukagawa city, Fukushima prefecture, in northern Japan on March 11, 2011. AFP/ Getty Images / Fukushima Minpo



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A factory building has collapsed in Sukagawa city, Fukushima prefecture, in northern Japan on March 11, 2011. A massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake shook Japan, unleashing a powerful tsunami that sent ships crashing into the shore and carried cars through the streets of coastal towns. AFP/ Getty Images / Fukushima Minpo



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Train passengers wait at Tokyo's Shinagawa station to get first-hand information on train service which was halted following a very strong earthquake on Friday March 11, 2011. AP / Hiro Komae



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Stranded commuters sit inside Tokyo railway station as train services are suspended due to a powerful earthquake in Tokyo Friday, March 11, 2011. AP / Hiro Komae



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Commuters sit stranded at Tokyo railway station as train services are suspended due to a powerful earthquake Friday, March 11, 2011. AP / Hiro Komae



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Hundreds of people wait for busses at a Tokyo bus terminal as commuter trains stopped their services in the Tokyo metropolitan area on March 11, 2011. AFP/ Getty Images /



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Local residents watch the devastation provoked by a tsunami tidal wave smashing vehicles and houses at Kesennuma city in Miyagi prefecture, northern Japan on March 11, 2011. AFP/ Getty Images /



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