A photo blog of world events by Sacbee.com Assistant Director of Multimedia Tim Reese.
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April 1, 2011
Spring storms across the U.S.
An April Fools' storm brought heavy snowfall to parts of New England on Friday, creating a late-season winter wonderland and giving thousands of kids a reprieve from school while causing agony for others with power outages and cars sliding off roads.
In Florida, windy, rainy weather furiously swept through the central part of the state on Thursday, knocking out power to tens of thousands of people, flooding roads and toppling trucks and small planes.
In California, residents in the Sierra Nevada high country are still digging out from a winter of relentless mountain storms that piled snow up to three stories high and could keep some ski resorts open until the Fourth of July. --AP
(19 images)

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The tail lights of a car traveling down a road during a spring snowstorm leave a light trail in this 30-second time exposure in Freeport, Maine, Friday, April 1, 2011. AP / Robert F. Bukaty


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Morgon Stahl, left, and her sister Amanda Stahl, right, both of Clinton, Mass., walk their pet poodle "Joe" through Central Park in downtown Clinton, Friday, April, 1, 2011. A spring snow storm dropped snow on parts of New England early Friday. AP / Steven Senne



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A motorist passes a sign urging drivers to reduce their speed to 45 mph during heavy snow fall on Interstate 295 in Freeport, Maine on Friday, April 1, 2011. AP / Robert F. Bukaty



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Rick Breau, left, and Chris Housser, right, both of Leominster, Mass., use a snow blower and a shovel to remove snow from a street hockey rink at the Leominster Dekhockey Center, in Leominster, Friday, April 1, 2011. Chris Housser, owner of the facility, said it is rare to be doing snow removal in April at the rink. AP / Steven Senne



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Milwaukee Brewers players jog in the snow at Great American Ball Park, Wednesday, March 30, 2011 in Cincinnati. The Brewers open their 2011 major league baseball season Thursday against the Cincinnati Reds in Cincinnati. AP / Al Behrman



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Ice sits on the leaves of a magnolia tree on Friday, March 25, 2011, in St. Louis. Highs in the upper 70's at the start of the week gave way to a cold wintry mix of precipitation and highs in the low 40's by week's end. AP / Jeff Roberson



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A woman crosses a snow-covered parking lot in downtown Anchorage, Alaska after a dusting of snow on Thursday, March 31, 2011 Anchorage Daily News / Bill Roth



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Colorado State Patrol and Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) personal turn traffic around on Colorado Highway 40 near Berthoud pass, Empire, Colo. on Wednesday, March 30, 2011, due to an avalanche that spans the road 50 feet long and ten feet high. AP / Nathan Bilow



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Todd Lemma clears snow from a neighbor's balcony in Serene Lakes, Calif. near Donner Summit on Tuesday March 29. The Sacramento Bee / Randy Pench



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Photographers and spectators gather to watch the giant Union Pacific rotary snowblower as it pauses near the Soda Springs, Calif. railroad crossing on Tuesday, March 29, 2011. The Sacramento Bee / Randy Pench



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Val Girling of San Francisco who has a place in Serene Lakes walks down a street in Serene Lakes, Calif on Tuesday, March 29. Residents in Serene Lakes near Donner Summit continue to dig out their homes which are buried in as much as 30 feet of snow. The Sacramento Bee / Randy Pench



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Christina Medefesser, left, and Penny Pritchard work on digging out their respective cars, Friday, March 25, 2011 in Truckee, Calif. Reno Gazette-Journal / Tim Dunn



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Lightning hits near NASA's Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) as a storm passes by the Kennedy Space Center, on March 31, 2011 in Cape Canaveral, Florida. Getty Images / Mark Wilson



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An ominous cloud rushes through Palm Harbor early Thursday, March 31, 2011 as a severe storm system moved quickly through Tampa Bay from the Gulf of Mexico, bringing hail, rain, high winds and the threat of tornadoes, according to the National Weather Service. St. Petersburg Times / Douglas R. Clifford



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A sea plane is overturned after a severe thunderstorm plowed through the Sun 'n Fun International Fly-In & Expo at the Lakeland Linder Regional Airport in Lakeland, Fla., Thursday, March 31, 2011. The Ledger / Rick Runion



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Rescue personnel check out a plane that overturned after a severe thunderstorm plowed through the Sun 'n Fun International Fly-In & Expo at the Lakeland Linder Regional Airport in Lakeland, Fla., Thursday, March 31, 2011. The Ledger / Rick Runion



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Elizabeth Duraj and her son Alexander, 9, pose next to a large tree that overturned in Winter Park, Florida, by powerful storms that moved through Central Florida on Wednesday, March 30, 2011. Orlando Sentinel / Jacob Langston



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In this photo taken March 29, 2011, emergency personnel keep watch on a large mudslide covering U.S. 101 north of Garberville, Calif. Officials estimate that a stretch of Highway 101 could be closed for up to two weeks. Crews may be able to open the section to one-way, controlled traffic in two to three days. The Times-Standard / Virginia Graziani



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An aerial view looking southbound shows the landslide blocking Highway 1 south of Rocky Creek Bridge, as California Highway Patrol fly their helicopter over Big Sur, Calif. on Thursday March 31, 2011. Monterey County Herald / David Royal



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