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June 7, 2011
Wallow fire still zero percent contained after more than a week

SPRINGERVILLE, Ariz. (AP) -- The 365-square-mile Wallow fire has been burning in ponderosa forests for more than a week, consuming 233,500 acres and destroying five buildings since it started May 29. It marched north Monday, aided by wind gusts of more than 60 mph. Fire officials said the blaze laid down a bit overnight and crews planned to work on its northeast side Tuesday. New mapping showed some lines have held but the fire was considered zero percent contained. The wind, forecast at 35 mph, remained a concern, said fire information officer Kelly Wood.
The fire has forced people to leave their homes in Alpine, Nutrioso and Greer, a picturesque town where most of the 200 full-time residents had already fled by the time deputies started going door-to-door. (32 images)

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Robert Joseph, 64, rides his ATV as smoke billows from the Wallow fire in Luna, N.M., Monday, June 6, 2011. Firefighters worked furiously Monday to save a line of mountain communities in eastern Arizona from a gigantic blaze that has forced thousands of people from their homes and cast a smoky haze over states as far away as Iowa. AP / Jae C. Hong


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Elizabeth Mylott, of Gilbert, Ariz., cheers firefighters entering Greer, Ariz. after the Wallow Fire forced the evacuation of the small mountain community Monday, June 6, 2011. Mylott owns a cabin in Pinetop. The Arizona Republic / Michael Chow



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Smoke from the Wallow Fire covers Eagar, Ariz., on Monday, June 6, 2011. The Arizona Republic / Michael Chow



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Firefighters listen during a briefing about the Wallow Fire in Eagar, Ariz., on Monday, June 6, 2011. The Arizona Republic / Michael Chow



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Smoke from the Wallow Fire covers a firefighter camp in Eagar, Ariz., on Monday, June 6, 2011. The Arizona Republic / Michael Chow



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Photos provided by Nasa and taken by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite on June 6, 2011, show smoke billowing from the Wallow Fire in eastern Arizona. The fire beneath the smoke is outlined in red. The 365-square-mile Wallow fire has been burning for more than a week. NASA / MODIS



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Smoke from the Wallow fire fills the sky as Sun sets over the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest near Luna, N.M., Monday, June 6, 2011. AP / Jae C. Hong



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Firefighter Brian Quimby, of Eagle River, Alaska, rests in a schoolyard after battling the Wallow fire in Eagar, Ariz., Sunday, June 5, 2011. AP / Jae C. Hong



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Smith River Hotshots, of Northern Calif., Joe Russgrove, left, and Forrest Gale relax in their truck at White Mountain Academy in Eager, Ariz., before going back on the line to fight a wildfire, Sunday, June 5, 2011. The Arizona Republic / Michael Chow



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People check out a large map of the Wallow Fire before the start of a community meeting held at Blue Ridge High School Sunday June 5, 2011, in Eager, Ariz. The Arizona Republic / Pat Shannahan



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An SUV drives through heavy smoke in Greer, Ariz., Sunday, June 5, 2011. AP / Jae C. Hong



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Judy Cline, right, an antique shop owner, is comforted by her neighbor Michael Carter Jr. and his girlfriend Kristi Spillman as Cline evacuates her shop in Greer, Ariz., Sunday, June 5, 2011. AP / Jae C. Hong



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Kristi Spillman, left, and her boyfriend Michael Carter Jr. wear bandanas as they gather their belongings in Greer, Ariz., Sunday, June 5, 2011. AP / Jae C. Hong



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A 1928 Oldsmobile sedan sits in a flatbed trailer as Allan Johnson, right, and Larry Duffy move furniture as they evacuate their home in Greer, Ariz., Sunday, June 5, 2011. AP / Jae C. Hong



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Barbara Keehn, 56, waters plants as heavy smoke from the Wallow fire fills the town of Greer, Ariz., Sunday, June 5, 2011. AP / Jae C. Hong



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Kelli Elliott wears a bandana because of smoke from the Wallow Fire while she cleans up the land around Life in Christ Fellowship Church, Saturday, June, 4, 2011 in Eagar, Ariz. The Arizona Republic / Jack Kurtz



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John Keane and his wife Marcia, wildfire evacuees from Nutrioso, walk their dogs outside a church as the town is filled with smoke from the Wallow Fire in Eager, Ariz., Saturday, June 4, 2011. AP / Jae C. Hong



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Stuffed deer and antelope heads sit in the bed of a pickup truck as Robb Tylor gathers his belongings in preparation to evacuate his home in Greer, Ariz. on Saturday, June 4, 2011. AP / Jae C. Hong



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Jim Tress, right, and his daughter Samantha move furniture as they evacuate their home in Greer, Ariz., Saturday, June 4, 2011. AP / Jae C. Hong



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Mike Taylor, center, and Kelly Busby from the Arizona Department of Transportation work at a check point in Picnic Hill, Ariz., Saturday, June 4, 2011. AP / Jae C. Hong



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Mike Taylor, left, from ADOT, talks to Ron Grittman, from Chino Valley, at a roadblock on Highway 180 at Nelson Reservoir, Friday, June 3, 2011 in Springerville, Ariz. The Arizona Republic / Jack Kurtz



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The smoke column from the Wallow fire towers over people going to the community meeting about the fire, Friday, June 3, 2011 in Springerville, Ariz. The Arizona Republic / Jack Kurtz



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Giant plumes of smoke from the Wallow Fire burning in the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest are visible from Highway 260 between Greer and Show Low, Ariz., on Friday June 3, 2011. Arizona Daily Star / Greg Bryan/ Arizona Daily Star



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Joe Sitarzewski from Eager studies maps of the Wallow fire during the community meeting at Round Valley Middle School Friday, June 3, 2011 in Eager, Ariz. The Arizona Republic / Jack Kurtz



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Backed by a downtown skyline obscured by smoke from Arizona wildfires, Ross Aranda takes Hombre on their morning walk in Pat Hurley Park on Albuquerque's west side, Friday, June 3, 2011 in Albuquerque, N.M. Albuquerque Journal / Dean Hanson



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Gaylynn Sullivan hugs her granddaughter Maecie Ziegler as Alpine, Ariz., residents learn of a mandatory evacuation due to the Wallow Fire burning in the Bear Wallow Wilderness southwest of Alpine, Ariz., Thursday June 2, 2011. Arizona Daily Star / Greg Bryan



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Teresa and Jim Pinter pack their car as they prepare to evacuate their home because of the Wallow Fire Thursday, June 2, 2011 in Alpine, Ariz. The Arizona Republic / Jack Kurtz



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A traffic sign announces the closure of U.S. 91 as smoke from the Wallow Fire burning in the Bear Wallow Wilderness fills the air in Alpine, Ariz., on Thursday, June 2, 2011. Arizona Daily Star / Greg Bryan



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An orange cast covers the town of Alpine, Ariz., as smoke billows in from the Wallow Fire burning in the Bear Wallow Wilderness southwest of Alpine, Ariz., on Thursday June 2, 2011. Arizona Daily Star / Greg Bryan



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Fire crew trucks along Forest Route 24 are dwarfed by large plumes of smoke from the Wallow Fire burning in the Bear Wallow Wilderness southwest of Alpine, Ariz., on Wednesday June 1, 2011. Arizona Daily Star / Greg Bryan



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One of two slurry planes drops its load, Wednesday, June 1, 2011 about three miles northeast of Sonoita, Ariz. Arizona Daily Star / David Sanders



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Flames engulf trees looking south from Forest Route 24 as the Wallow Fire burns in the Bear Wallow Wilderness southwest of Alpine, Ariz., on Wednesday June 1, 2011. Arizona Daily Star / Greg Bryan



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