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July 27, 2011
China premier orders probe into deadly train crash
BEIJING (AP) -- Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao on Wednesday ordered a sweeping and transparent probe into the weekend collision between two bullet trains that killed at least 39 people and raised public anger about the government's handling of the accident.
Facts must be uncovered, responsible parties held to account, and investigation results made public, Wen told a cabinet meeting, according to a news release posted to the government's official website.
Six carriages derailed and four fell about 65 to 100 feet (20 to 30 meters) from a viaduct Saturday night after one train plowed into the back of a stalled train. More than 190 people were injured. The government on Tuesday ordered a two-month safety campaign for its railway system amid questions about how the crash occurred. (20 images)



Relatives of the victims in Saturday's train crash talk to the media as they hold a banner demanding pursuit of truth of the accident during a protest at Wenzhou South Railway Station in Wenzhou, east China's Zhejiang Province, Wednesday, July 27, 2011. AP


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Relatives of the victims in Saturday's train crash, one holding a port of his loved one, block the entrance gate during a protest at Wenzhou South Railway Station in Wenzhou, east China's Zhejiang Province, Wednesday, July 27, 2011. AP



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A worker cleans a CRH high-speed train parked at the Beijing South Station in Beijing, China, Tuesday, July 26, 2011. AP / Andy Wong



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In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, an excavator dismantles a wrecked train car which was involved in Saturday's accident at its site near Wenzhou, east China's Zhejiang Province, early Tuesday, July 26, 2011. AP / Xing Guangli



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In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, a train passes a viaduct as an excavator dismantles a wrecked train car which was involved in Saturday's accident at its site near Wenzhou, east China's Zhejiang Province, early Tuesday, July 26, 2011. AP / Xu Yu



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In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, the wreckage of a carriage is lifted up for transportation at the crash site near Wenzhou, east China's Zhejiang Province, Tuesday, July 26, 2011. AP / Wang Dingchang



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In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, a truck transporting the debris of train cars leaves the site of Saturday's crash near Wenzhou, east China's Zhejiang Province, Tuesday, July 26, 2011. AP / Xing Guangli



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In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, relatives of the victims in Saturday's train crash cry after seeing the bodies of their loved ones in a funeral home in Wenzhou, east China's Zhejiang Province, Tuesday, July 26, 2011. AP / Lu Chunyu



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A child looks at people taking part in a candle lights vigil for the train crash victims in a square in Wenzhou in east China's Zhejiang province Tuesday, July 26, 2011. AP



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A bullet train passes over the wrecked carriages involved in Saturday's crash in Wenzhou, east China's Zhejiang Province, on Monday, July 25, 2011. AP



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In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, a bullet train passes a viaduct from which carriages fell after Saturday's crash near Wenzhou, east China's Zhejiang Province, Monday, July 25, 2011. AP / Xing Guangli



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A wrecked passenger carriage is lifted off the bridge in Wenzhou in east China's Zhejiang province, on Sunday, July 24, 2011. AP / CHINATOPIX



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In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, workers operate excavators around the wreckage of train cars Sunday, July 24, 2011 in Wenzhou, east China's Zhejiang Province, after a train collision and derailment Saturday night. AP / Liang Zhen



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Chinese rescuers work around the wreckage of train cars in Wenzhou in east China's Zhejiang province, Sunday, July 24, 2011. AP



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In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, workers prepare to clear the wrecked train cars in Wenzhou, east China's Zhejiang Province, Sunday, July 24, 2011. AP / Ju Huanzong



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In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, workers prepare to clear the wrecked train cars in Wenzhou, east China's Zhejiang Province, Sunday, July 24, 2011. AP / Ju Huanzong



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In this photo released by China's Xinhua news agency, rescuers work at a train accident in Wenzhou, eastern China, Sunday, July 24, 2011. AP / Ju Huanzong



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In this photo released by China's Xinhua news agency, a rescuer takes a picture of a train accident in Wenzhou, eastern China, Sunday, July 24, 2011. AP / Ju Huanzong



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Emergency workers and civilians search for passengers from the wreckage of a train crash in Wenzhou in east China's Zhejiang province, Saturday, July 23, 2011. AP



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Emergency workers and people work to help passengers from the wreckage of train after two carriages from a high-speed train derailed and fell off a bridge in Wenzhou in east China's Zhejiang province Saturday July 23, 2011. AP / CHINATOPIX



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