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August 4, 2011
A look at the Himalayan territory of Kashmi
NEW DELHI (AP) -- The foreign ministers of India and Pakistan spoke recently of entering a new era in relations between their nuclear-armed nations, after meeting on July 27, for the first time since bilateral peace talks resumed this year.
While no major breakthroughs on their thorny disputes had been expected, the two agreed to work more closely in fighting terrorism and to ease commerce and travel across the U.N.-drawn Line of Control dividing their nations.
The Himalayan territory of Kashmir -- a major source of tension that fueled two of three wars fought by the rivals since 1947 -- will continue to be discussed "with a view to finding a peaceful solution," Indian Foreign Minister S.M. Krishna said. Both nations claim the whole territory now split between them and maintain heavy deployments along the border.
The following images were made by Associated Press stringers Channi Anand and Altaf Qadri in Kashmir. (31 images)



An Indian army soldier trains on a high rope at the Siachen base camp, in Indian Kashmir on the border with Pakistan on July 19, 2011. The nuclear-armed South Asian nations have competing territorial claims to Siachen, often dubbed the world's highest battlefield, and troops have been locked in a standoff there at an altitude of up to 20,000 feet (6,100-meter) since 1984, when Indian forces occupied the glacier. Indian and Pakistani foreign secretaries held talks Tuesday against the backdrop of a recent terror attack that killed 20 people in India's financial capital, ahead of the countries' foreign ministers meet Wednesday. AP / Channi Anand


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Indian army soldiers return after a training session at the Siachen base camp, in Indian Kashmir on the border with Pakistan on July 19, 2011. AP / Channi Anand



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Indian army soldiers undergo a training session at the Siachen base camp, in Indian Kashmir on the border with Pakistan on July 19, 2011. AP / Channi Anand



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Indian army soldiers prepare to climb a glacier as they undergo a training session at the Siachen base camp, in Indian Kashmir on the border with Pakistan on July 19, 2011. AP / Channi Anand



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Indian army soldiers return after a training session at the Siachen base camp, in Indian Kashmir on the border with Pakistan on July 19, 2011. AP / Channi Anand



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Indian army soldiers returning from the border posts get a briefing at the Siachen base camp, in Indian Kashmir on the border with Pakistan on July 19, 2011. AP / Channi Anand



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Indian army soldiers undergo a training session at the Siachen base camp, in Indian Kashmir on the border with Pakistan on July 19, 2011. AP / Channi Anand



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An Indian army soldier trains on a high rope at the Siachen base camp, in Indian Kashmir on the border with Pakistan on July 19, 2011. AP / Channi Anand



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Indian army soldiers watch a training session at the Siachen base camp, in Indian Kashmir on the border with Pakistan on July 19, 2011. AP / Channi Anand



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Indian army soldiers return from the border posts to the Siachen base camp, in Indian Kashmir on the border with Pakistan on July 19, 2011. AP / Channi Anand



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Children play cricket near Pangong Lake, near the India-China border in Ladakh, India on July 26, 2011. Ladakh is a remote part of the former princely state of Kashmir, which is at the heart of the six-decade conflict between nuclear-armed neighbors India and Pakistan. While Kashmir is best known for the Indo-Pakistani standoff, part of Ladakh, an ethnically distinct region with historical ties to Tibet, has been controlled by China for decades. AP / Channi Anand



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People stand by the banks of the Pangong Lake, near the India-China border in Ladakh, India on July 22, 2011. AP / Channi Anand



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Tourists ride double hump camels at Nubra valley, in Ladakh, India on July 20, 2011. AP / Channi Anand



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A Hindu pilgrim is carried on a palanquin by porters on her way to the Amarnath cave shrine at Sheeshnag, 140 kilometers (87 miles) from Srinagar,India on July 27, 2011. At least half a million devotees make the pilgrimage to the icy cave which lies 13,500 feet (4,115 meters) above sea level in Indian-controlled Kashmir amid tight security. Hindus worship a stalagmite inside the cave as an incarnation of the Lord Shiva, the Hindu god of destruction and regeneration. AP / Altaf Qadri



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Hindu pilgrims are carried on palanquins by Muslim bearers over a glacier near Amarnath Cave,150 kilometers (93 miles) from Srinagar, India on July 28, 2011. AP / Altaf Qadri



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Hindu pilgrims ascend a hill to the Amarnath cave shrine amid rain at Sheeshnag, 140 kilometers (87 miles) from Srinagar, India on July 27, 2011. AP / Altaf Qadri



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Hindu pilgrims take bath with ice cold water before visiting the Amarnath cave shrine near Amarnath Cave,150 kilometers (93 miles) from Srinagar, India on July 27, 2011. AP / Altaf Qadri



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A Hindu pilgrim gets his head shaved as part of a ritual after visiting the Amarnath cave shrine,150 kilometers (93 miles) from Srinagar, India on July 27, 2011. AP / Altaf Qadri



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Hindu pilgrims ascend a hill on their way to the Amarnath cave shrine amid rain at Sheeshnag, 140 kilometers (87 miles) from Srinagar, India on July 27, 2011. AP / Altaf Qadri



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Hindu pilgrims make their way to the Amarnath cave shrine over a glacier near Panchtarni, 150 kilometers (93 miles) from Srinagar, India on July 27, 2011. AP / Altaf Qadri



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Hindu pilgrims are on their way to the Amarnath cave shrine at Sheeshnag, 140 kilometers (87 miles) from Srinagar, India on July 27, 2011. AP / Altaf Qadri



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A Hindu pilgrim descends a hill on his way to the Amarnath cave shrine at Brari Marg, 150 kilometers (93 miles) from Srinagar, India on July 28, 2011. AP / Altaf Qadri



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A Kashmiri Muslim horseman tries to comfort a Hindu child crying before resuming their trek towards holy Amarnath cave shrine from Sheeshnag, 140 kilometers (87 miles) from Srinagar, India on July 27, 2011. AP / Altaf Qadri



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Hindu pilgrims are on their way to the Amarnath cave shrine at Sheeshnag, 140 kilometers (87 miles) from Srinagar, India on July 27, 2011. AP / Altaf Qadri



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Horses used by pilgrims are tied at a camp site at Sheeshnag, 140 kilometers (87 miles) from Srinagar, India. AP / Altaf Qadri



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Barefooted Hindu pilgrims walk their way to the Amarnath cave shrine at Sheeshnag, India on July 27, 2011. AP / Altaf Qadri



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A Hindu pilgrim carries a child on his shoulder as he along with other pilgrims ascends a hill to the Amarnath cave shrine at Sheeshnag, 140 kilometers (87 miles) from Srinagar, India on July 27, 2011. AP / Altaf Qadri



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A Hindu pilgrim is carried by porters on his way to the Amarnath cave,150 kilometers (93 miles) from Srinagar, India on July 28, 2011. AP / Altaf Qadri



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Muslim horsemen and laborers eat dinner inside a tent at a Hindu pilgrimage camp site at Sheeshnag, 140 kilometers (87 miles) from Srinagar, India on July 27, 2011. AP / Altaf Qadri



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Hindu pilgrims walk over a glacier as they walk towards the Amarnath cave shrine, in background, near Amarnath Cave,150 kilometers (93 miles) from Srinagar, India on July 27, 2011. AP / Altaf Qadri



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An Indian army soldier patrols a hill top overlooking a Hindu pilgrimage camp site near Pishu Top, 135 kilometers (85 miles) from Srinagar, India on July 27, 2011. AP / Altaf Qadri



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