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November 7, 2011
Muslim hajj pilgrims perform devil stoning ritual
MINA, Saudi Arabia (AP) -- Chanting "God is great," millions of Muslims on Sunday stoned pillars representing the devil in a symbolic rejection of temptation on the second day of their annual hajj pilgrimage, a day that also marks the start of the Islamic holiday of Eid al-Adha.
Vast crowds cast pebbles as they flowed past the three pillars, which now resemble curved walls, in a four-level sprawling concrete structure built to expedite the flow of pilgrims. The ritual will be repeated for two more days, with participants eventually throwing stones at all three pillars.
The ritual in the desert valley of Mina commemorates Abraham's stoning of the devil, who is said to have appeared three times to the prophet to tempt him.(33 images)



Muslim pilgrims cast stones at a pillar, symbolizing the stoning of Satan, in a ritual called "Jamarat," the last rite of the annual hajj, in Mina near the Saudi holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP


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A crowd of Muslim pilgrims make their way to throw cast stones at a pillar, symbolizing the stoning of Satan, in a ritual called "Jamarat," the last rite of the annual hajj, in Mina near the Saudi holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Muslim pilgrims cast stones at a pillar, symbolizing the stoning of Satan, in a ritual called "Jamarat," the last rite of the annual hajj, in Mina near the Saudi holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Muslim pilgrims cast stones at a pillar, symbolizing the stoning of Satan, in a ritual called "Jamarat," the last rite of the annual hajj, in Mina near the Saudi holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Muslim pilgrims cast stones at a pillar, symbolizing the stoning of Satan, in a ritual called "Jamarat," the last rite of the annual hajj, in Mina near the Saudi holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Muslim pilgrims cast stones at a pillar, symbolizing the stoning of Satan, in a ritual called "Jamarat," the last rite of the annual hajj, in Mina near the Saudi holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Muslim pilgrims protect their heads from stones thrown by others at a pillar, symbolizing the stoning of Satan, in a ritual called "Jamarat," the last rite of the annual hajj, in Mina near the Saudi holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Saudi policemen help a Muslim pilgrim holding his baby as others cast stones at a pillar, symbolizing the stoning of Satan, in a ritual called "Jamarat," the last rite of the annual hajj, in Mina near the Saudi holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Muslim women pilgrims make their way to throw cast stones at a pillar, symbolizing the stoning of Satan, in a ritual called "Jamarat," the last rite of the annual hajj, in Mina near the Saudi holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Muslim pilgrim pray outside Namira mosque in Arafat near Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Muslim pilgrim pray outside Namira mosque in Arafat near Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011. T Hassan Ammar / AP



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Muslim pilgrims pray on a rocky hill called the Mountain of Mercy, on the Plain of Arafat near Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Muslim pilgrims climb a rocky hill called the Mountain of Mercy, on the Plain of Arafat near Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Muslim pilgrims pray on a rocky hill called the Mountain of Mercy, on the Plain of Arafat near Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Muslim pilgrims head to pray on a rocky hill called the Mountain of Mercy, on the Plain of Arafat near Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Friday, Nov. 4, 2011. The annual Islamic pilgrimage draws 2.5 million visitors each year, making it the largest yearly gathering of people in the world. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Muslim pilgrims pray in the shade of on of the minarets of the Grand Mosque, in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Friday, Nov. 4, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Tens of thousands of Muslim pilgrims pray inside the Grand Mosque, in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Friday, Nov. 4, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Egyptian customers line up to buy meat at a butcher Shop in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Nov.4, 2011 as a preparation for the upcoming Eid Al-Adha holiday (Feast of Sacrifice) which marks the end of the annual Muslim hajj pilgrimage to Mecca. Amr Nabil / AP



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A camel is transported in a truck in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Nov. 4, 2011 in preparation for the upcoming Eid Al-Adha holiday. Amr Nabil / AP



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Muslim pilgrims head to pray on a rocky hill called the Mountain of Mercy, on the Plain of Arafat near Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Friday, Nov. 4, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Muslim pilgrims pray on a rocky hill called the Mountain of Mercy, on the Plain of Arafat near Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Friday, Nov. 4, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Tens of thousands of Muslim pilgrims pray inside the Grand Mosque, in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Friday, Nov. 4, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Saudi special forces stand guard as Muslim pilgrims pray during Friday prayers at the Grand Mosque, in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Friday, Nov. 4, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Thousands of Muslim pilgrims head to Mina after Friday prayer at the Grand Mosque, in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Friday, Nov. 4, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Egyptian kindergarten children of the Degla Azharian language school in Cairo, Egypt, move around a replica of Islam's holiest shrine, the Kaaba, which is within the Grand Mosque in Mecca Saudi Arabia Thursday Nov. 3, 2011, as they simulate the Hajj, a day ahead of the start of the hajj, one of the biggest annual events in the world. The Arabic writing on the replica are some of the names of God in Islam "the Merciful, the Compassionate and the Peaceful". Amr Nabil / AP



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Tens of thousands of Muslim pilgrims move around the Kaaba, seen at center, inside the Grand Mosque, in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Tens of thousands of Muslim pilgrims move around the Kaaba, seen at center, inside the Grand Mosque, in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Tens of thousands of Muslim pilgrims pray outside and inside the Grand Mosque,, in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Tens of thousands of Muslim pilgrims pray at the Grand Mosque, in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Tens of thousands of Muslim pilgrims pray outside and inside the Grand Mosque,, in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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Hundreds of thousands of pilgrims gather at the Grand Mosque in Mecca on Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011. Wang Bo / ZUMA24.com



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Muslim pilgrims visit the Hiraa cave, at the top of Noor Mountain on the outskirts of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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A Muslim pilgrim prays as visits the Hiraa cave, at the top of Noor Mountain on the outskirts of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011. Hassan Ammar / AP



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