A photo blog of world events by Sacbee.com Assistant Director of Multimedia Tim Reese.
Subscribe to feed Subscribe to this blog's feed
December 19, 2011
North Korea mourns Kim Jong II
PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) -- North Koreans marched by the thousands Monday to their capital's landmarks to mourn Kim Jong Il, many crying uncontrollably and flailing their arms in grief over the death of their "Dear Leader."
North Korean state media proclaimed his youngest son, Kim Jong Un, a "Great Successor," while a vigilant world watched for any signs of a turbulent transition to the untested leader in an unpredictable nation known to be pursuing nuclear weapons. (20 images)



North Korean women cry after learning death of their leader Kim Jong Il on Monday, Dec. 19, 2011 in Pyongyang, North Korea.North Korea's news agency reported Monday that he had died at 8:30 a.m. Saturday after having a heart attack on a train, adding that he had been treated for cardiac and cerebrovascular diseases for a long time. He was 69. AP / Kyodo News


kim_jong_death_02.jpg
Hundreds of North Koreans gather to mourn the death of their leader Kim Jong Il in front of a giant statue of his father Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea, Monday, Dec. 19, 2011. AP



kim_jong_death_03.jpg
North Korean women cry after learning death of their leader Kim Jong Il on Monday, Dec. 19, 2011 in Pyongyang, North Korea. Kim died on Saturday, Dec. 17, North Korean state media announced Monday. AP / Kyodo News



kim_jong_death_04.jpg
North Koreans cry after learning death of their leader Kim Jong Il on Monday, Dec. 19, 2011 in Pyongyang, North Korea. AP / Kyodo News



kim_jong_death_05.jpg
Women in military dress and civilian dress cry as North Koreans gather after learning death of their leader Kim Jong Il on Monday, Dec. 19, 2011 in Pyongyang, North Korea. AP / Kyodo News



kim_jong_death_06.jpg
North Korean women cry after learning death of their leader Kim Jong Il on Monday, Dec. 19, 2011 in Pyongyang, North Korea. Kim died on Saturday, Dec. 17, North Korean state media announced Monday. AP / Kyodo News



kim_jong_death_07.jpg
North Korean women cry after learning death of their leader Kim Jong Il on Monday, Dec. 19, 2011 in Pyongyang, North Korea. Kim died on Saturday, Dec. 17, North Korean state media announced Monday. AP / Kyodo News



kim_jong_death_08.jpg
Women collapse in tears as North Koreans gather after learning death of their leader Kim Jong Il on Monday, Dec. 19, 2011 in Pyongyang, North Korea. Kim died on Saturday, Dec. 17, North Korean state media announced Monday. AP / Kyodo News



kim_jong_death_09.jpg
A pair of North Korean women hold their hands to their faces as they queue up to pay their respects to Kim Jong Il at a joint portrait of him and his father Kim Il Sung in downtown Pyongyang, North Korea, on the day that North Korea announced that Kim Jong Il had died, Monday, Dec. 19, 2011. AP / Kyodo News



kim_jong_death_10.jpg
A North Korean official stands near portraits of late North Korean leaders Kim Il Sung, left, and his son Kim Jong Il, at Pyongyang airport in Pyongyang, North Korea Monday, Dec. 19, 2011. AP / Greg Baker



kim_jong_death_11.jpg
People arrive at Pyongyang airport below portraits of late North Korean leaders Kim Il Sung, left, and his son Kim Jong Il, in Pyongyang, North Korea Monday, Dec. 19, 2011. AP / Greg Baker



kim_jong_death_12.jpg
A North Korean shuttle bus driver waits to take passengers to a flight at the airport in Pyongyang, North Korea, on Monday, Dec. 19, 2011. AP / David Guttenfelder



kim_jong_death_13.jpg
A North Korean official stands near a TV screen as a newsreader speaks about the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, at Pyongyang airport in Pyongyang, North Korea Monday, Dec. 19, 2011. AP / Greg Baker



kim_jong_death_14.jpg
A North Korean soldier mans a guard post near the Pyongyang, North Korea, airport on Monday, Dec. 19, 2011. North Korean state media has said that the country's leader Kim Jong Il died on Dec. 17 of a heart ailment. AP / David Guttenfelder



kim_jong_death_15.jpg
A giant North Korean flag hangs at half-staff to mourn the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il in North Korean side in the demilitarized zone (DMZ) near the border village of Panmunjom that separates the two Koreas since the Korean War, in Paju, north of Seoul, South Korea, Monday, Dec. 19, 2011. AP / Shin Jun-hee



kim_jong_death_16.jpg
South Korean army soldiers patrol along the barbed-wire fence near the demilitarized zone in Paju, South Korea, before sunset Monday, Dec. 19, 2011. AP / Lim Byung-shik



kim_jong_death_17.jpg
A South Korean army soldier uses binoculars to watch Northern side after news reporting about the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il at a guard post in the demilitarized zone between South and North Korea in Cheolwon, South Korea, Monday, Dec. 19, 2011. AP / Lee Hae-ryoung



kim_jong_death_18.jpg
South Koreans watch a news reporting about the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il on TV screens at the Yongsan Electronic shop in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, Dec. 19, 2011. AP / Ahn Young-joon



kim_jong_death_19.jpg
People read extras with the headline which reads "General Secretary Kim dies" on Monday, Dec. 19, 2011 near Osaka train station in Osaka, western Japan. AP / Kyodo News



kim_jong_death_20.jpg
A man reacts as he walks with others, carrying flowers towards the North Korean Embassy in Beijing Monday, Dec. 19, 2011. AP / Ng Han Guan



About Comments

Reader comments on Sacbee.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Sacramento Bee. If you see an objectionable comment, click the "report abuse" button below it. We will delete comments containing inappropriate links, obscenities, hate speech, and personal attacks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. See more about comments here.

What You Should Know About Comments on Sacbee.com

Sacbee.com is happy to provide a forum for reader interaction, discussion, feedback and reaction to our stories. However, we reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments or ban users who can't play nice. (See our full terms of service here.)

Here are some rules of the road:

• Keep your comments civil. Don't insult one another or the subjects of our articles. If you think a comment violates our guidelines click the "report abuse" button to notify the moderators. Responding to the comment will only encourage bad behavior.

• Don't use profanities, vulgarities or hate speech. This is a general interest news site. Sometimes, there are children present. Don't say anything in a way you wouldn't want your own child to hear.

• Do not attack other users; focus your comments on issues, not individuals.

• Stay on topic. Only post comments relevant to the article at hand. If you want to discuss an issue with a specific user, click on his profile name and send him a direct message.

• Do not copy and paste outside material into the comment box.

• Don't repeat the same comment over and over. We heard you the first time.

• Do not use the commenting system for advertising. That's spam and it isn't allowed.

• Don't use all capital letters. That's akin to yelling and not appreciated by the audience.

You should also know that The Sacramento Bee does not screen comments before they are posted. You are more likely to see inappropriate comments before our staff does, so we ask that you click the "report abuse" button to submit those comments for moderator review. You also may notify us via email at feedback@sacbee.com. Note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us the profile name of the user who made the comment. Remember, comment moderation is subjective. You may find some material objectionable that we won't and vice versa.

If you submit a comment, the user name of your account will appear along with it. Users cannot remove their own comments once they have submitted them, but you may ask our staff to retract one of your comments by sending an email to feedback@sacbee.com. Again, make sure you note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us your profile name.

hide comments

On October 14, The Sacramento Bee will temporarily remove commenting from sacbee.com. While we design the upgrade, we encourage you to tell us what you like and don't like about commenting on sacbee.com and other websites. We've heard from hundreds of you already and we're listening. Please continue to add your thoughts and questions here. We also encourage you to write Letters to the Editor on this and other topics.