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January 18, 2012
Costa Concordia cruise ship disaster
ROME (AP) -- The first victim from the Costa Concordia diaster was identified Wednesday -- a 38-year-old violinist from Hungary who had been working as an entertainer on the stricken cruise ship.
Sandor Feher's body was found inside the wreck, and identified by his mother who traveled to the Italian city of Grosetto, according to Hungary's foreign ministry.
The $450 million Costa Concordia cruise ship was carrying more than 4,200 passengers and crew when it slammed into a reef Friday off the tiny Italian island of Giglio after the captain made an unauthorized maneuver. The death toll stands at 11, with 22 people still missing.
Italian rescue workers suspended operations Wednesday after the cruise ship shifted slightly on the rocks near the Tuscan coast, creating deep concerns about the safety of divers and firefighters searching for the missing.
(33 images)



This satellite image made Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2012, provided by DigitalGlobe on Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2012, shows the hulk of the luxury cruise ship Costa Concordia, which ran aground the Tuscan tiny island of Isola del Giglio, Italy, on Friday, leaning on its starboard side. As the Costa Concordia keeps shifting on its rocky ledge, many have raised the prospect of a possible environmental disaster if the 2,300 tons of fuel on the half-submerged cruise ship leaks. AP / DigitalGlobe


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This picture released on Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2012 by the Italian Space Agency (A.S..I.) and taken on Saturday, Jan. 14, 2012, about nine hours after the luxury cruise ship Costa Concordia ran aground the Tuscan tiny island of Isola del Giglio, Italy, shows the hulk of the ship surrounded by rescuers and investigators boats. AP / Italian Space Agency



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This aerial black-and-white video image shot with an infrared camera and made available by the Italian Coastguard Tuesday Jan. 17, 2012 appears to show passengers of shipwrecked cruise liner Costa Concordia slipping down the belly of the luxury liner one-by-one using a rope to reach a lifeboat, bottom left, late Friday Jan. 13, 2012 off Giglio Island, Italy. AP / Italian Coastguard



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The cruise ship Costa Concordia lays on its side off the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2012. Search teams have suspended operations after an enormous cruise ship grounded and partially submerged off the coast of Tuscany shifted under turbulent seas. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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A floating barrier is used to prevent any eventual oil spill from cruise ship Costa Concordia leaning on its side after running aground the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2012. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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The cruise ship Costa Concordia lays on its side off the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2012. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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The cruise ship Costa Concordia lays on its side off the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2012. AP / Andrea Sinibaldi



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The cruise ship Costa Concordia lays on its side off the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2012. AP / Andrea Sinibaldi



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The cruise ship Costa Concordia lays on its side off the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2012. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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The cruise ship Costa Concordia lays on its side off the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2012. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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The cruise ship Costa Concordia lays on its side off the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2012. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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Italian naval divers recover a body from the cruise ship Costa Concordia, Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2012. Italian media say five bodies have been found aboard a cruise ship capsized off the coast of Tuscany, raising the official death toll to 11. Teams have been searching the ship for passengers and crew missing since the Costa Concordia struck rocks Friday evening and capsized. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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Italian navy divers approach the cruise ship Costa Concordia Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2012, after it ran aground on the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, on Friday evening. Italian naval divers on Tuesday exploded holes in the hull of a cruise ship that grounded near a Tuscan island to speed the search for 29 missing passengers and crew while the seas remain relatively calm. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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The cruise ship Costa Concordia leans on its side Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2012, after running aground on the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, on Friday evening. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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Italian naval divers recover a body from the cruise ship Costa Concordia, Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2012. Italian media say five bodies have been found aboard a cruise ship capsized off the coast of Tuscany, raising the official death toll to 11. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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A scuba diver recovers a body from the cruise ship Costa Concordia, Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2012. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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Italian naval divers work on the cruise ship Costa Concordia Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2012, after running aground on the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, on Friday evening. AP / Andrea Sinibaldi



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Italian naval divers approach the cruise ship Costa Concordia Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2012, after it ran aground on the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, on Friday evening. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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The cruise ship Costa Concordia lays on its side after running aground off the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2012. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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The cruise ship Costa Concordia lays on its side after running aground Friday evening on the Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2012. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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Underwater photo taken on Jan. 13 and released by the Italian Coast Guard Jan. 16, shows a view of the cruise ship Costa Concordia, after it ran aground in front of the Isola del Giglio harbor. ZUMA24.com / Kika Press



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In this underwater photo released by the Italian Coast Guard Monday, Jan. 16, 2012 the cruise ship Costa Concordia leans on its side, after it ran aground off the tiny Tuscan island of Isola del Giglio, Italy. AP / Italian Coast Guard



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In this underwater photo taken on Jan. 13 and released by the Italian Coast Guard Monday, Jan. 16, 2012 a view of the cruise ship Costa Concordia, after it ran aground near the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy. AP / Italian Coast Guard



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Italian firefighters walk Monday, Jan. 16, 2012, on the cruise ship Costa Concordia leaning on its side after running aground the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, last Friday night. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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The capsized Costa Concordia cruise ship is lit up at night as it lies just off the rocky shore of the Tuscan island of Giglio after it ran aground. ZUMA24.com / Federico Scoppa



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Italian firefighters scuba divers approach the cruise ship Costa Concordia leaning on its side, the day after it ran aground off the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, Sunday, Jan. 15, 2012. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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Italian Navy scuba divers approach the cruise ship Costa Concordia leaning on its side, the day after running aground the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, Sunday, Jan. 15, 2012. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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Survivors of the luxury cruise ship Costa Concordia, which ran aground near the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, arrive at the harbor, in Marseille, southern France, Saturday, Jan. 14, 2012. AP / Claude Paris



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A police officer holds a baby wrapped in a blanket as passengers of the luxury ship Costa Concordia that ran aground off the coast of Tuscany arrive on a ferry in Porto Santo Stefano, Italy, Saturday, Jan. 14, 2012. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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Passengers of the luxury ship that ran aground off the coast of Tuscany disembark a ferry in Porto Santo Stefano, Italy, Saturday, Jan. 14, 2012. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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In this photo taken on Saturday, Jan. 14, 2012, Francesco Schettino the captain of the luxury cruiser Costa Concordia, which ran aground off Italy's Tuscan coast, enters a Carabinieri car in Porto Santo Stefano, Italy. AP / Enzo Russo



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The luxury cruise ship Costa Concordia leans on its side after running aground the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, Saturday, Jan. 14, 2012. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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The luxury cruise ship Costa Concordia leans on its side after running aground the tiny Tuscan island of Giglio, Italy, Saturday, Jan. 14, 2012. AP / Gregorio Borgia



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