A photo blog of world events by Sacbee.com Assistant Director of Multimedia Tim Reese.
Subscribe to feed Subscribe to this blog's feed
December 28, 2012
Fishermen fear losing livelihood in Peru

EL CALLAO, Peru (AP) -- Fishermen living around Peru's largest port have harvested the sea as a means of survival since the 16th century.

Their way of life, however, is soon bound to change.

Many of them fear a project to modernize El Callao, transforming it into the most important port on South America's Pacific coast, will force them to abandon fishing.

Development of the port undertaken by APM Terminals, a global shipping industry giant based in the Netherlands, will expand port operations over the next several years.

The impact that modernization may soon have on fishing isn't the only worry weighing down on the port's fishermen.

Decades ago, Peru's coastline provided a plentiful bounty. But overfishing has depleted the waters of scorpion fish, horse mackerel and mullet.

Fishermen once arrived at El Callao's pelican-infested docks and sold as much as 110 pounds of fish. These days, no more than 15 pounds are offered. -- Photo package by Rodrigo Abd / Associated Press

(25 images)




Marvin Vega unloads a crate of anchovies from the holding area of a "boliche," the Peruvian term for boats that are used by fishermen who fish with nets, at the port of El Callao, Peru on Dec. 12, 2012. Development of the Peru's largest and oldest port undertaken by a global shipping industry giant based in the Netherlands, will expand port operations over the next couple of years. Many fishermen fear the modernization of the port may have a negative impact on their livelihood. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_02.jpg
A fishing crew heads out on their "boliche," the Peruvian term for boats that are used by fishermen who fish with nets, for a fishing expedition in the Pacific Ocean, off the coast of the port of El Callao, Peru on Nov. 29, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_03.jpg
Fisherman Alvaro rows his "boliche," the Peruvian term for boats that are used by fishermen who fish with nets, in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of the port of El Callao, Peru on Nov. 30, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_04.jpg
Fisherman Alvaro rows a small boat during a fishing expedition in the Pacific Ocean, off the coast of El Callao, Peru on Dec. 1, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_05.jpg
Seabirds hover nearby, as fishermen ride on a "boliche," the Peruvian term for boats that are used by fishermen who fish with nets, in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of the port of El Callao, Peru on Dec. 5, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_06.jpg
Birds out in the open ocean gather near fishing boats in the Pacific waters off Peru, near the port of El Callao, about 7 miles west of Lima on Nov. 22, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_07.jpg
Fishermen work to unload a net full of anchovies during a fishing expedition in the Pacific Ocean, off the coast of El Callao, Peru on Nov. 22, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_08.jpg
Fishermen work together to lift a net full of anchovies into their boat during a fishing expedition in the Pacific Ocean, off the coast of El Callao, Peru on Nov. 22, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_09.jpg
Fisherman Walter Richardi naps on the stern of a fishing boat, headed to a productive fishing area for anchovies, followed by a flock of seabirds, in the Pacific Ocean, off the port of El Callao, Peru on Nov. 20, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_10.jpg
Irvin Torres sits quietly in the early morning hours, in the bow of a fishing boast, waiting for a signal from the captain who works to spot schools of fish with a technical device, in the Pacific Ocean, off the coast of El Callao, Peru on Dec. 5, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_11.jpg
Fishermen Lucho Revilla Silva, top, and Jose Luis Guerero return to the port of El Callao, after a night of fishing in the Pacific waters off the coast of Peru on Dec. 1, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_12.jpg
Fisherman Fabricio Tinoco prepares fresh fish for the crew on the Manuelita II fishing boat as they head for the port of El Callao after fishing in the Pacific waters off Peru on Nov. 29, 2012. Navigating the waters off Peru's 1,490-mile (2,400 kilometer) coastline can be extremely risky. Fishermen know they cannot trust the sea, recognizing their return to port is never guaranteed. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_13.jpg
Fishermen spread out a net for repair at the port in El Callao, Peru on Nov. 27, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_14.jpg
Dock workers move a crate of freshly caught fish at the port in El Callao, Peru on Nov. 12, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_15.jpg
The carcasses of fish that were gutted and filleted for customers, fill a trash bin to the brim at the Villa Maria del Triunfo market, one of the largest fish markets in Lima, Peru on Nov. 28, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_16.jpg
Cyntia de la Cruz eats lunch on a break form unloading crates of anchovies from "boliches," the Peruvian term for boats that are used by fishermen who fish with nets, at the port of El Callao, Peru on Nov. 16, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_17.jpg
Cyntia de la Cruz sits on a sofa with her colleagues Kimberly, right, and Wendy as they take a smoke break after unloading crates of fish from "boliches," the Peruvian term for boats that are used by fishermen who fish with nets, at the port of El Callao, Peru on Dec. 6, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_18.jpg
A dock worker smiles as he rinses off in water contaminated with motor oil, fish blood and garbage, at the the end of his work day of unloading fish from "boliches," the Peruvian term for boats that are used by fishermen who fish with nets, at the port of El Callao, Peru on Dec. 6, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_19.jpg
Humberto Cova Mendoza, who works skinning fish, poses for a portrait at the port of El Callao, Peru on Nov. 27, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_20.jpg
Fisherman Raymundo Manso smokes a cigarette after docking at the port of El Callao, Peru on Nov. 13, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_21.jpg
Fishermen and dock workers play a card game at the port in El Callao, Peru on Nov. 19, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_22.jpg
Fishermen eating lunch in the bow of a fishing boat, docked in the port of El Callao, after a night of fishing in the Pacific waters off the coast of Peru on Dec. 4, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_23.jpg
Two fishermen rest inside their docked fishing vessel at the port in El Callao, Peru on Nov. 22, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_24.jpg
A dog waits for its owner; a fisherman selling his catch of the day at the market at the port in El Callao, Peruon Nov. 30, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd
peru_fishermen_fear_25.jpg
A single anchovy floats in a pool of water stained with the blood of fish skinned by dock workers at the port of El Callao, Peru on Dec. 4, 2012. AP / Rodrigo Abd

About Comments

Reader comments on Sacbee.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Sacramento Bee. If you see an objectionable comment, click the "report abuse" button below it. We will delete comments containing inappropriate links, obscenities, hate speech, and personal attacks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. See more about comments here.

What You Should Know About Comments on Sacbee.com

Sacbee.com is happy to provide a forum for reader interaction, discussion, feedback and reaction to our stories. However, we reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments or ban users who can't play nice. (See our full terms of service here.)

Here are some rules of the road:

• Keep your comments civil. Don't insult one another or the subjects of our articles. If you think a comment violates our guidelines click the "report abuse" button to notify the moderators. Responding to the comment will only encourage bad behavior.

• Don't use profanities, vulgarities or hate speech. This is a general interest news site. Sometimes, there are children present. Don't say anything in a way you wouldn't want your own child to hear.

• Do not attack other users; focus your comments on issues, not individuals.

• Stay on topic. Only post comments relevant to the article at hand. If you want to discuss an issue with a specific user, click on his profile name and send him a direct message.

• Do not copy and paste outside material into the comment box.

• Don't repeat the same comment over and over. We heard you the first time.

• Do not use the commenting system for advertising. That's spam and it isn't allowed.

• Don't use all capital letters. That's akin to yelling and not appreciated by the audience.

You should also know that The Sacramento Bee does not screen comments before they are posted. You are more likely to see inappropriate comments before our staff does, so we ask that you click the "report abuse" button to submit those comments for moderator review. You also may notify us via email at feedback@sacbee.com. Note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us the profile name of the user who made the comment. Remember, comment moderation is subjective. You may find some material objectionable that we won't and vice versa.

If you submit a comment, the user name of your account will appear along with it. Users cannot remove their own comments once they have submitted them, but you may ask our staff to retract one of your comments by sending an email to feedback@sacbee.com. Again, make sure you note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us your profile name.

hide comments

On October 14, The Sacramento Bee will temporarily remove commenting from sacbee.com. While we design the upgrade, we encourage you to tell us what you like and don't like about commenting on sacbee.com and other websites. We've heard from hundreds of you already and we're listening. Please continue to add your thoughts and questions here. We also encourage you to write Letters to the Editor on this and other topics.