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February 25, 2013
Talk of peace with Pakistan Taliban angers victims

PESHAWAR, Pakistan (AP) -- Hazratullah Khan, who lost his right leg below the knee in a car bombing, answers immediately when asked whether the Pakistani government should hold peace talks with Taliban leaders responsible for attacks like the one that maimed him.

"Hang them alive," said the 14-year-old, who survived the explosion on his way home from school. "Slice the flesh off their bodies and cut them into pieces. That's what they have been doing to us."

In recent weeks, the Pakistani government and Taliban forces fighting in northwestern tribal areas have expressed an interest in peace talks to end the years-long conflict. An estimated 30,000 civilians and 4,000 soldiers have died in terrorist attacks in Pakistan since Sept. 11, 2001 -- many at the hands of the Pakistani Taliban.

To many victims of Taliban violence, the idea of negotiating with people responsible for so much human pain is abhorrent. Their voices, however, are rarely heard in Pakistan, a country where people have long been conflicted about whether the Taliban are enemies bent on destroying the state or fellow Muslims who should be welcomed back into the fold after years of fighting.

The Associated Press spoke with victims of terrorist attacks in Peshawar, Lahore, Karachi, Quetta and the tribal areas and their families to find out how they felt about negotiating peace with the Taliban.

(13 images)




Pakistani Kawthar Javaid, 42, who was injured by a remote control bomb in Faisalabad in 2005, poses for a picture in Rawalpindi, Pakistan on Aug. 2, 2012.. To many victims of Taliban violence, the idea of negotiating with people responsible for so much human pain is abhorrent. Their voices, however, are rarely heard in Pakistan, a country where people have long been conflicted about whether the Taliban are enemies bent on destroying the state or fellow Muslims who should be welcomed back into the fold after years of fighting. AP / Muhammed Muheisen
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Left: Pakistani newspaper seller Mohammed Rafiq, 20, who was injured in a bomb blast on June, 29, 2008, in Swat valley, poses for a picture in Islamabad, Pakistan on Tuesday July 12, 2012. Right: Pakistani Jan Mohammed Khan, 45, who was injured October, 9, 2007, by a remote control bomb in Peshawar, poses for a picture in Rawalpindi, Pakistan on Aug. 7, 2012. AP / Muhammed Muheisen
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Pakistani student Hazratullah Khan, 14, who was injured in a car bombing on December 17, 2012 in Peshawar, poses for a picture in Peshawar, Pakistan on Feb. 21, 2012. Hazratullah Khan's right leg was amputated below the knee after he survived a car bombing as he was on his way home from school. His response when asked whether peace talks should be held with the Taliban leaders who ordered attacks like the ones that maimed him is simple: Hang them alive. Slice their flesh off their bodies and cut them into pieces. AP / Muhammed Muheisen
taliban_victiims_04.jpg
Left: Pakistani Shamiza Nazir, 45, who was injured in a suicide bombing in Lahore, on January, 25, 2011, reacts while posing for a picture, in Lahore, Pakistan on Aug. 5, 2012. Right: Pakistani Bachir Gul, 42, who was injured by a remote control bomb in Peshawar on October, 9, 2007, reacts while posing for a picture, in Peshawar, Pakistan on July 12, 2012. AP / Muhammed Muheisen
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Pakistani Gani Abdul Rahman, 32, who was injured on July, 17, 2007, by a bomb blast in Islamabad, poses for a picture in Islamabad, Pakistan on July 27, 2012. Hazratullah Khan's right leg was amputated below the knee after he survived a car bombing as he was on his way home from school. AP / Muhammed Muheisen
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Left: Pakistani student Farouq Aftab, 12, who was injured on June, 12, 2012, by a bomb planted on a donkey-cart in Peshawar, reacts while posing for a picture in Peshawar, Pakistan on July 15, 2012. Right: Pakistani politician Israr Shah, 56, who was injured in a bomb blast in Islamabad on July, 17, 2007, poses for a picture, in Islamabad, Pakistan on July 30, 2012. AP / Muhammed Muheisen
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Pakistani daily worker Mufeed Ali, 48, who was injured by a remote control bomb at Lahore train station, on April, 24, 2012, reacts while posing for a picture in Lahore, Pakistan on July 7, 2012. AP / Muhammed Muheisen
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Left: Pakistani security guard Ayoub Yousef, 25, who was injured by a suicide bomber in Peshawar, on December 22, 2009, reacts while posing for a picture in Peshawar, Pakistan on July 12, 2012. Right: Pakistani student Yaseen Azizul Rahman, 19, who was injured in 2007 by a remote control bomb in Peshawar, poses for a picture, in Peshawar, Pakistan on July 12, 2012. AP / Muhammed Muheisen
taliban_victiims_09.jpg
Pakistani student Tahir Wilayat, 17, who was injured on June, 12, 2012, by a bomb planted on a donkey cart in Peshawar, poses for a picture in Peshawar, Pakistan on July 15, 2012. AP / Muhammed Muheisen

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