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April 17, 2013
Images from the Boston Marathon bombing and aftermath

BOSTON (AP) - By Wednesday, two days after the bombing, investigators in white jumpsuits had fanned out across the streets, rooftops and awnings around the blast site in search of clues. They combed through debris amid the toppled orange sports drink dispensers, trash cans and sleeves of plastic cups strewn across the street at the marathon's finish line.

President Barack Obama branded the attack an act of terrorism. Obama plans to attend an interfaith service Thursday in the victims' honor in Boston.

Scores of victims of the Boston bombing remained in hospitals, many with grievous injuries. Doctors who treated the wounded corroborated reports that the bombs were packed with shrapnel intended to cause mayhem. In addition to the 5-year-old child, a 9-year-old girl and 10-year-old boy were among 17 victims listed in critical condition.

(20 images)




Mourners attend candlelight vigil for Martin Richard at Garvey Park, near Richard's home in the Dorchester section of Boston, on Tuesday, April 16, 2013. Martin is the 8-year-old boy killed in the Boston Marathon bombing. The New York Times / Josh Haner
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Investigators comb through the post finish line area of the Boston Marathon at Boylston Street, two days after two bombs exploded just before the finish line, Wednesday, April 17, 2013, in Boston. AP / Julio Cortez
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Two men in hazardous materials suits put numbers on the shattered glass and debris as they investigate the scene at the first bombing on Boylston Street in Boston Tuesday, April 16, 2013 near the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon, a day after two blasts killed three and injured over 170 people. AP / Elise Amendola
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One of the blast sites on Boylston Street near the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon is investigated by two people in protective suits in the wake of two blasts in Boston Monday, April 15, 2013. AP / Elise Amendola
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Emma MacDonald, 21, center, reacts while remembering the victims of the Boston Marathon explosions during a vigil at Boston Common, Tuesday, April 16, 2013, one day after bombs exploded at the finish line of the marathon. AP / Julio Cortez
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Neighbors sit outside the house of Krystle Campbell's parents in Medford, Mass.,Tuesday, April 16, 2013. Campbell was killed in Monday's explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. AP / Michael Dwyer
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Neighbors hug outside the home of the Richard family in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, Tuesday, April 16, 2013. Martin Richard, 8, was killed in Monday's bombing at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. AP / Michael Dwyer
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Boston Marathon runner Vu Trang, of San Francisco, cries at a makeshift memorial on Boylston Street near the finish line of Monday's Boston Marathon explosions. AP / Charles Krupa
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President Barack Obama turns to leave after speaking in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, April 16, 2013, following the explosions at the Boston Marathon. AP / Charles Dharapak
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Boston University student Joy Liu places a note at a memorial on the campus for Boston Marathon bombing victim Lu Lingzi in Boston Wednesday, April 17, 2013. Lu and two friends had been watching the Boston Marathon near the finish line. AP / Winslow Townson
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Medical workers aid an injured man at the 2013 Boston Marathon following an explosion in Boston, Monday, April 15, 2013. Two bombs exploded near the finish of the Boston Marathon on Monday. The Boston Globe / David L. Ryan
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Boston Firefighter James Plourde carries an injured girl away from the scene after a bombing near the finish line of the Boston Marathon in Boston on Monday, April 15, 2013. MetroWest Daily News / Ken McGagh
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Medical workers aid injured people at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon following an explosion in Boston, Monday, April 15, 2013. The Boston Globe / David L. Ryan
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Medical workers aid an injured woman at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon following two explosions there, Monday, April 15, 2013 in Boston. AP / Charles Krupa
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An unidentified Boston Marathon runner is comforted as she cries in the aftermath of two blasts which exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon in Boston, Monday, April 15, 2013. AP / Elise Amendola
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Medical responders run an injured man past the finish line the 2013 Boston Marathon following an explosion in Boston, Monday, April 15, 2013. AP / Charles Krupa
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Medical workers aid injured people at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon following an explosion in Boston, Monday, April 15, 2013. AP / Charles Krupa
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Injured people and debris lie on the sidewalk near the Boston Marathon finish line following an explosion in Boston, Monday, April 15, 2013. MetroWest Daily News / Ken McGagh
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Bill Iffrig, 78, lies on the ground as police officers react to a second explosion at the finish line of the Boston Marathon in Boston, Monday, April 15, 2013. Iffrig, of Lake Stevens, Wash., was running his third Boston Marathon and near the finish line when he was knocked down by one of two bomb blasts. The Boston Globe / John Tlumacki
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People react as an explosion goes off near the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon in Boston, Monday, April 15, 2013. Two explosions went off at the Boston Marathon finish line on Monday, sending authorities out on the course to carry off the injured while the stragglers were rerouted away from the smoking site of the blasts. The Boston Globe / David L. Ryan

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