The State Worker

Chronicling civil-service life for California state workers

December 29, 2010
Four in 10 Americans give corporate America a 'D' or 'F'

The public's dissatisfaction isn't reserved for the public sector.

A survey released Tuesday found that 40 percent of Americans polled assigned a grade of "D" or "F" to corporate America for its performance in 2010, while 82 percent gave business a grade of "C" or lower.

Meanwhile, only 17 percent gave corporate America an "A" or a "B" for their performance in the past year.

The findings from a recent online survey of 1,081 Americans, conducted by the StrategyOne research arm of the global PR firm Daniel J. Edelman, show that corporations failed the expectations of 61 percent of Americans. Only 5 percent said that businesses exceeded their expectations.

Researchers found that Americans think corporate America's highest priorities next year should be helping to improve the economy, reducing unemployment, promoting ethical corporate behavior, paying back federal bailout money, making raising service standards, making quality products that require fewer recalls and making fewer mistakes overall.

We asked Bradley Honan, senior vice president of StrategyOne, to send more results than those contained in the press release. Here's what he e-mailed (fair warning -- it's a long list):

Consumer Views on Corporate Priorities and Performance

· 88% of consumers said it was extremely or very important that companies help get the economy back on track in 2011, but only 17% said companies deserved an 'A' or 'B' for their efforts on this in 2010. 84% said companies deserved a 'C' or below.

· 88% said it was extremely or very important to conduct business in an ethical manner in 2011, and 87% said it was a top priority to do business in an honest and moral way. But just 17% of Americans thought companies deserved an 'A' or 'B' for honest and moral conduct in 2010, and just 18% awarded companies an 'A' or 'B' for their ethics in 2010.

· 87% said it was a top priority for corporations to address unemployment by creating more jobs in America in 2011. But just 11% thought companies deserved an 'A' or 'B' for creating jobs in 2010, and 89% graded companies 'C' or lower for adding jobs.

· 85% of consumers thought it was extremely or very important for companies in 2011 to deliver high quality products and services, although only 31% said companies deserved an 'A' or 'B' for this in 2010.

· 84% said it was a top priority for companies to survive a recession in 2011, while 30% of consumers felt companies earned an 'A' or 'B' grade for this in 2010.

· 84% of Americans thought companies needed to demonstrate good governance in 2011, while only 16% felt corporations had earned an 'A' or 'B' grade on this issue in 2010.

· 83% said it was the highest importance for corporations to pay back any bailout money loaned them as quickly as possible in 2011, but 78% of consumers said companies deserved a 'C' or below for this issue in 2010.

· 83% of consumers said it was extremely or very important for corporations to maintain current levels of employment, but only 14% said corporations deserved an 'A' or 'B' for this in 2010.

· 82% said it was a top priority for companies to make fewer mistakes and errors in 2011, while just 19% gave companies an 'A' or 'B' for this in 2010.

· 82% of consumers said it was of the highest importance for corporations to build trust with all groups and individuals they interact with in 2011, while only 15% thought companies deserved an 'A' or 'B' for this in 2010.

· 81% of Americans felt it was extremely or very important for companies to address the healthcare needs of their employees, though only 16% said companies deserved an 'A' or 'B' for this in 2010.

· 79% of consumers feel it's a high priority for corporations should deliver expected financial performance in 2011, though only 22% awarded companies an 'A' or 'B' on this task in 2010.

· 79% said it was extremely or very important for America's corporations to maintain their competitive advantage, while 25% felt companies earned an 'A' or 'B' for this in 2010.

· 79% of Americans said it was a top priority for companies in 2011 to attract and retain high caliber employees, while 23% said corporations deserved an 'A' or 'B' for this during 2010.

· 79% said it was of the highest importance for corporations to improve their overall reputation in 2011, while 18% felt companies deserved an 'A' or 'B' on this topic in 2010.

· 78% of consumers said it was extremely or very important for companies to be more open or transparent about the decisions they make in 2011, but only 16% of consumers said companies deserved an 'A' or 'B' on this issue in 2010.

· 78% of Americans say it's extremely or very important for corporations to advocate on behalf of the interests of the American people, but only 14% think companies earned an 'A' or 'B' for this in 2010.

· 78% of consumers thought companies should work to reduce the gap between CEO pay and that of average workers in 2011, but 90% said corporations earned a 'C' or below on that task in 2010.

· 75% thought that it was extremely or very important for companies to create innovative new services and products in 2011, while 32% felt companies deserved an 'A' or 'B' grade for this in 2010.

· 75% of consumers said it was a top priority for companies to significantly reduce the number of product recalls in 2011, although only 21% said corporations earned an 'A' or 'B' for their work in this regard in 2010.

· 75% of Americans said it was extremely or very important for companies to innovate new products and services in 2011, but only 31% awarded companies an 'A' or 'B' for this in 2010.

· 71% thought that it was a high priority for companies to work in partnership with others to address important societal issues that we face as a nation, but only 16% thought corporations earned an 'A' or 'B' for this in 2010.

· 70% of Americans thought it was of the highest importance for companies to increase employee benefits in 2011, but just 10% thought corporations deserved an 'A' or 'B' for this in 2010.

· 70% of consumers said it was extremely or very important for companies to contribute solutions to social and environmental challenges, while 17% awarded companies an 'A' or 'B' for this issue in 2010.

On October 14, The Sacramento Bee will temporarily remove commenting from sacbee.com. While we design the upgrade, we encourage you to tell us what you like and don't like about commenting on sacbee.com and other websites. We've heard from hundreds of you already and we're listening. Please continue to add your thoughts and questions here. We also encourage you to write Letters to the Editor on this and other topics.



About The State Worker

Jon Ortiz The Author

Jon Ortiz launched The State Worker blog and a companion column in 2008 to cover state government from the perspective of California government employees. Every day he filters the news through a single question: "What does this mean for state workers?" Join Ortiz for updates and debate on state pay, benefits, pensions, contracts and jobs. Contact him at (916) 321-1043 and at jortiz@sacbee.com.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK

State Pay Database

This database allows you to search the salaries of California's 300,000-plus state workers and view up to four years of their pay history.

Categories


October 2013

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31    

Monthly Archives