Things to do in Sacramento and Beyond

The Bee's guide to events, activities, arts and entertainment


April 20, 2011
Wild & Scenic Film Fest coming to Crest

The Wild & Scenic Film Festival is making a stop at the Crest Theater on April 28.

The festival has already made its way to 15 cities since January - from Juneau, Alaska to Santa Fe, N.M.

Films include "Wild Water," Anson Fogels' exploration of the individuals who passionately venture into whitewater, and "Truck Farm," wherein filmmaker Ian Cheney explores the rooftops and windows of New York City's newest edible oases (full schedule below).

Wild & Scenic Film Festival
WHEN: 6:30 p.m., April 28
WHERE: Crest Theatre, 1013 K St., Sacramento
COST: $10
INFORMATION: (916)202 9093; www.thecrest.com; habitat@ecosacramento.net

Film Program


Greenhorns (20 min)
Severine von Tscharner Fleming
The focus is young farmers as unlikely poster children of a new zeitgeist. In many communities bright 20- and 30-somethings are contributing and leading the way into a new world of agriculture, sustainability and economics. PLEASE NOTE: This film is a 20-minute, extended trailer for a pending feature film. www.thegreenhorns.net

Wild Water (25 min)
Anson Fogel
A journey into the soul of whitewater, where only river runners can go. Meet the river-people who share a deep passion for wild places, rivers and running whitewater.

Slow the Flow (27 min)
Elizabeth Pepin Silva
Follows a landscaper who shocks his neighbors by putting in native landscaping. Also a discovery of a school district that goes green. Meet a non-profit which puts gardens in the city. The projects highlighted are very low-tech, cheap, and beautiful, making a good argument for kicking back and not raking the leaves.

As It Happens (21 min)
Renan Ozturk
In January 2010, Renan Ozturk & Cory Richards boarded planes bound for the Everest region of Nepal. Their goal was not only to establish a new alpine climb on 21,320 ft Tawoche, but also to tell the story from the field. With digital cameras, solar energy, a satellite modem, and two laptops, they shot, edited, and transmitted their journey from the Himalaya. Using online social media, their story was followed by over 100k people in real time.

Intermission

Majestic Plastic Bag (4 min)
Jeremy Konner
Follow a plastic bag from supermarket to its final migratory destination in the Pacific Ocean gyre. Jeremy Irons narrates this mock, nature documentary.

Truck Farm (48 min)
Ian Cheney, Curtis Ellis
From the creators of Big Corn (2007) and Big River (2009) comes Truck Farm. After filmmaker Ian Cheney plants a garden in the back of his pickup, he and the Truck Farm set out to explore the rooftops and windows that represent NYC's newest edible oases. Featuring time machines, Victorian dancers, physicists, nutritionists, chefs, and explorer Henry Hudson.

Open Space (8 min)
Jeremy Roberts
Produced for Sonoran Institute, Open Space examines the loss of one of the West's most valuable assets, open space, which serves as a community's agricultural base and wildlife habitat. The film offers a new vision for communities and landscapes in the American West.

Change For the Oceans (2 mins)
Free Range Studios
Change for the Oceans was created for Monterey Bay Aquarium's campaign to raise awareness about the impacts of global climate change on ocean life. Film shows how individuals can slow the crisis by making little changes as well as big changes. Narrated by John Cleese.

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